When we see the coming and going of schools as just the market at work, we're in trouble.


State legislatures should insure that a variety of college courses are available, for free, on every high school campus and that the state also make courses on college campuses available at no cost to students. This gives students a "leg up" and also helps them develop the kind of "academic momentum" that increases high school graduation rates, as well as completion rates at a one, two or four year college program.


For all our preaching about democracy, we are strangely reluctant to practice it in schools, says Deborah Meier.


We agree that if you want a distinctive school to last, you need to develop other professional staff who can lead.


Developing the best habits of citizenship in a democracy is the central task of K-12 schooling—if we still honor democracy.


The opinions expressed in Bridging Differences are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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