Dear Deborah, I'm glad to hear that your travels across the country have left you feeling inspired and encouraged about possibilities for change. I am too. I just spoke to over 400 school board members (CABE Connection Association of Boards of Education) in Groton, Connecticut on Saturday and I was pleasantly surprised to see how open they were to embracing a broad reform agenda that rejects our narrow fixation on using assessment as a weapon to judge teachers and schools. I'm still not sure about what it will take to get the Obama Administration to adopt a different approach to ...


There simply is no way to know when and how the democratic forces will rise up, as they did here in Chi-town, and say, "Enough of that! We've got a different plan."


I don't think we need to produce a manifesto for change, but we do need to begin to outline some key steps that could be taken to move public education in a different direction.


When disaster strikes (like Sandy) we don't expect the police to volunteer their time, nor the firemen, nor doctors and nurses—although no doubt many do go above and beyond their obligations. But we do expect teachers to make up for the impact of poverty and austerity politics on schoolchildren.


for harm averted. But to be fair, it's more than that. In addition to preventing even more severe cuts to education, the administration has helped millions of college students by keeping interest payments for loans down and tripling the number of people who can participate in AmeriCorps service programs.


The opinions expressed in Bridging Differences are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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