What both countries seem to be engaged in is how to move closer to the other, without losing the strengths of each. And, of course, their "purposes" are not wholly in synch. Both want to strengthen their economies, but the Chinese state schools are not trying also to produce feisty and critical citizens for a democracy.


As the pressure to reach the targets get tougher, many districts are devising ways to raise their graduation rates that have nothing to do with thinking and learning. A prime suspect is credit recovery.


She made clear that it wasn't for me to think. But even more serious, I had missed the whole point: "Hadn't I read the curriculum guide?"


Of course, Pearson is not just a publisher of standardized tests. It is a mega-corporation. It is a behemoth of for-profit goods and services to the education marketplace.


I remember, Diane, in 1967 telling kindergarteners in Harlem about the struggle for integration in southern schools. I stopped and looked at the faces of my 5-year-olds. Every single one was black. What did they make of what I was saying? What do they think today?


The opinions expressed in Bridging Differences are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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