In the aftermath of the 2016 presidential election, democracy in schools is more important than ever in the effort to win over Trump supporters on the part of those who didn't support the Republican candidate, writes Deb Meier.


Hillary Clinton's defeat stems, in significant part, from the "cult of the expert" and the reliance on Big Data which infused it. The philosophy of democracy schools, resting on an alternative view of the person -- as unique, dynamic, full of co-creative agentic potential -- is a profound alternative.


Between the U.S. Presidential Election of 2016 and the hierarchical bureaucracy of school leadership, the politics of democracy for the education community are at stake, argues Deborah Meier.


Education has a crucial role to play in launching a "campaign to remember" stories of agency, or popular empowerment, like the common school movement and many others. It also has the capacity to play such a role. This need is vivid illustrated by the election. People have forgotten that "we the people" created the nation itself, in a fight against a king.


The narrative of the "common school movement" should be representative of the diverse group of students and school options it serves, argues Deborah Meier.


The opinions expressed in Bridging Differences are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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