Their letter is historic. It's the first time that a large number of administrators have spoken out in opposition to bad ideas. It represents hundreds of educators who are willing to stick their necks out, hundreds of educators wiling to speak truth to power, hundreds of educators who put their name on a statement to the state's highest education officials, with this simple message: "Stop! What you are doing is wrong. What you are imposing on us is untested. We believe it will be harmful to our students."


It will take longer and more complicated "sit-ins" to impact on the inequalities now rampant in our country. It will take creative thinking and an attitude toward each other's compromises that is sufficiently tolerant to allow for many routes to recapturing democracy.


It rejected the U.S. Department of Education's demands for competition and accountability, preferring to implement its own community-based, collaborative vision of school reform.


We CANNOT afford the existing gross confusion between achievement and test scores. It has led us to promote the kind of education quick fix no one would propose for its "ruling class."


Despite the manifest failure of NCLB, the Obama administration proposes not to scrap it, but to offer waivers if states agree to accept the mandates selected by Secretary of Education Arne Duncan.


The opinions expressed in Bridging Differences are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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