It always surprises me that small class size is understood to be critical to teachers and students knowing each other well by some who then condemn small schools.


It is astonishing to realize the extent to which education debates are now framed and dominated by economists, not by educators or sociologists or cognitive psychologists or anyone else who actually spends time in classrooms.


I had such faith in the abstract when I began teaching. And to my delighted surprise even the children I was told were too deprived to play, or had no language for play, etc., took to it without a single lesson.


But I am even more offended by the prospect that Mark Twain's classic work will be expurgated, rewritten by someone who wants to shield readers from the book's original language. How did we become such delicate creatures that we cannot dare to read a word that might discomfit us?


No serious discussion can take place among people who hold so many different pictures of both current and past realities and have no patience for digging further.


The opinions expressed in Bridging Differences are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Most Viewed on Education Week

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments