So long as we continue to avert our gaze from the festering problems bred by deep poverty and racial isolation, it seems unlikely that any school reform agenda can produce the transformation that our society seeks.


We've just learned that Diane Ravitch will receive the 2011 Daniel Patrick Moynihan Prize from the American Academy of Political and Social Science. To quote from the Academy's website: the prize was created to "recognize social scientists and other leaders in the public arena who champion the use of informed judgment to advance the public good." Diane is being honored for her work in urban education, both as a researcher and a public official. Congratulations, Diane! Reminder: Bridging Differences returns Jan. 4, 2011....


Bridging Differences takes a well-deserved break starting today. The blog will return on Tuesday, Jan. 4, 2011. Happy holidays to all, and see you in the new year!...


I was talking about the present dangerous effort to distort the purposes of education, to hand vast numbers of public schools over to private corporations, and to treat children as data points to satisfy misguided politicians, policy-makers, and economists.


There is simply no doubt that our Founding Fathers would have been shocked to discover that decadent Europe was more egalitarian—with greater mobility and shared sacrifice—than the United States.


The opinions expressed in Bridging Differences are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Most Viewed on Education Week

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments