The film "Waiting for 'Superman'" offers a one-sided and contemptuous view of public education, Diane Ravitch writes.


Wealth brings privileges. To pretend otherwise and insist that the "gaps" between the wealthy and the poor aren't important is not just a benign mistake; it's a dangerous one. When we allow the target to shift to "lazy" teachers and power-hungry unions, we should feel guilty, Mr. Guggenheim.


The superintendents' manifesto does not come from the powerless. It was written by men and women who are in charge of major school systems and who certainly have far more power than parents, teachers, principals, or ordinary citizens.


Deborah Meier uses Frederick Hess's book, The Same Thing Over and Over, as the springboard for a bigger look at school reform and the conflict between hype and reality in school change.


Charters are not a silver bullet. They are a lead bullet. Their target is American public education.


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