Apple removed 181 vaping-related apps from its App Store in an effort to limit teens' exposure to content that could lead to harm or illness.


One teacher embraced the technique, with encouragement from a former district administrator. But he was told he had to reverse course, in part because of parent complaints.


The platform, Amazon Ignite, will allow teachers to sell lesson plans and curriculum materials by topic, in subjects like math, language arts, social studies, technology, and science.


Instagram will begin hiding "like" counts on photos for some U.S. users, pleasing some child advocates while raising red flags for Instagram-friendly teachers.


Having access to a computer or tablet doesn't necessarily make students computer literate, according to a study of computer-literacy skills across countries.


Social media keeps vaping top-of-mind for teens, according to the survey. Nearly 60 percent say they're likely to see a post that mentions or shows vaping.


The Arkansas Department of Education will now provide on-site help for schools and districts in the state that are experiencing cybersecurity incidents.


The percentage of kids who report watching videos online "every day" has more than doubled in the past four years, going from 24 percent in 2014 to 56 percent in 2019, among 8 to 12 year-olds.


Back in 2013, before an overhaul of the e-rate program, just 30 percent of school districts were able to take advantage of digital learning. Now, that figure stands at a whopping 99 percent, according to a new report from EducationSuperHighway.


You're more likely to get a "good" job if you're white, compared to someone with exactly the same education level who is black or Latino, a new report from Georgetown University finds.


Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Most Viewed on Education Week

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments