« ISTE Outlines Top Tech Priorities of 2010 | Main | Interest in Digital Textbooks Growing »

Weekend Reading About Ed Tech

As we head into the holiday weekend I'm looking forward to some extra time to catch up on my reading. There have been so many great discussions going on about how to use technology effectively, whether on the Twitter #edchats, the many teacher social networks, blogs, and other media.

Here's what I've got lined up for browsing, skimming, or deeper reading:

Blogs: Shelly Blake-Plock has had some really intriguing posts already this year and I'm already behind. Considering he published 639 entries on his Teach Paperless blog in 2009 it's going to be hard to keep up, but well worth the try.
Tom Whitby, an active promoter of professional learning communities on Twitter, started his own blog, My Island View, this week.
John Spencer, a Phoenix-based teacher, writes the Adventures in Pencil Integration blog in the voice of a fictional teacher from 1897 struggling to embrace the 20th century and use the latest technology, pencil and paper, effectively in the classroom.

Reports: "Informing Communities: Sustaining Democracy in a Digital Age," from The Knight Commission on the Information Needs of Communities in a Democracy.

Books: Rethinking Education in the Age of Technology, by Allan Collins and Richard Halverson; Catching Up or Leading the Way: American Education in the Age of Globalization, by Yong Zhao; 21st Century Skills: Learning for Life in Our Times, by Bernie Trilling and Charles Fadel.

Now I'm a slow reader and I do have some fun activities planned for the weekend, so no telling how far I'll get. But I'd be interested to learn what others in the field are reading. And if you have any other suggestions, send them my way.

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Login | Register
Ground Rules for Posting
We encourage lively debate, but please be respectful of others. Profanity and personal attacks are prohibited. By commenting, you are agreeing to abide by our user agreement.
All comments are public.

Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Most Viewed on Education Week

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments