September 2014 Archives

University of Connecticut researchers say a new study points to significant income-based gaps in how students read and comprehend material on the Internet.


California's new student-data-privacy bill prohibits vendors from selling student information and restricts targeting advertising and the building of student profiles.


An indie video game dubbed "No Pineapple Left Behind," currently under development, offers a satirical take on public school management. Its motto: "They take tests. You make money."


Philadelphia's recent history with "innovative" high schools has been mostly discouraging, but one educator featured in a 2009 Ed Week story is still fighting to reinvent schooling.


Pennsylvania will allow schools to use digital strategies to keep schools running in the event of inclement weather, beginning this year.


A federal judge in Florida has ordered an online school that the Federal Trade Commission labeled a "diploma mill" to halt marketing to students.


A non-profit launched by the U.S. Education Department in 2011 to help support ed-tech innovation now works with 56 districts to identify and spread promising practices.


Evaluators of L.A.'s closely-watched iPad initiative found a continued reliance on whole-class instruction and almost no use of a multimillion-dollar digital curriculum from Pearson.


The advance of student-data-privacy legislation in California and elsewhere has attracted media attention in recent weeks.


John Deasy, under scrutiny for his own communications with technology companies, has filed a public records request seeking information about school board members' correspondence with vendors.


Seattle-based nonprofit Code.org announced new free online learning resources to teach students computer science and provide teachers with professional development.


MIT and Harvard University's online-learning platform edX released this week a set of 26 courses targeted at high school students.


Devices and apps have evolved since 2010, probably more quickly than parents' strategies for monitoring teens' digital usage and regulating teens' digital access as a form of discipline.


At a tour of NASA's space camp in Huntsville, Ala., the education secretary put the spotlight on the science, technology, engineering, and math fields.


More students are using mobile devices for schoolwork, but just one in six U.S. schoolchildren attends a school that provides all student with their laptop or tablet, according to a new survey from Pearson.


A 2009 lawsuit filed by the ACLU highlighted a still-evolving legal issue: When can school administrators search students' cellphones and social media accounts?


Los Angeles schools chief John Deasy fired back at critics questioning the integrity of the process behind a $30 million contract with Apple and Pearson.


A 1989 report on schools' technology planning featured some long-forgotten devices and terminology, but many familiar concerns.


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