In this Ed Week article I look at educational television and the latest efforts to study its impact on children's literacy development. Yesterday I came across this study, by the Children's Hospital of Boston and Harvard Medical School, that concludes "TV viewing before the age of 2 does not improve a child's language and visual motor skills." The longitudinal study of children from birth to age 3, published in the March issue of Pediatrics, didn't measure any detrimental affects of television viewing. But the researchers say there are other indications that children younger than 2 should not watch television, which ...


The Consortium for School Networking, the Washington-based association for school district technology leaders, has revamped its Web site to include more interactive tools and social networking features. Two new forums, for example, will launch this week to allow educators to discuss the impact of technology on K-12 classrooms, as well as new and innovative applications for educational technology. The organization also hosts blogs, social networks, and a resource library of ed tech materials, reports, and surveys. CoSN's is hosting its annual conference next week in Austin, and we will be blogging from there about the latest tech trends, concerns, and ...


A couple weeks back, Education Sector released a new report about the role of technology in assessment. The report, "Beyond the Bubble: Technology and the Future of Student Assessment," talked about how technology could be used to automate assessments to provide quicker feedback. But it also looked at how it could help transform assessment to provide meaningful data on students' test answers and, perhaps more importantly, how they got them. From today through Thursday, Education Sector is hosting a discussion about the report with its author, Bill Tucker, as well as education experts Charles Barone, Margaret Honey, and Scott Marion. ...


This video of the last day at the Rocky Mountain News, the latest newspaper to close up shop in the midst of a spiraling downturn in the news industry, was posted on Vimeo a few days ago by Matthew Roberts. Over at The Joy of Children's Literature blog Denise Johnson wonders if today's generation will remember how the news "used to be published." Final Edition from Matthew Roberts on Vimeo. Of course this is a topic near and dear to me and my colleagues. It's not just the demise of the broadsheet that worries journalists, but the seeming growing indifference ...


Edweek.org now has a widget for our coverage related to the federal stimulus. You can embed this widget in your blog or on your Web site to help readers follow the latest news and analysis on how the huge infusion of federal money is being targeted for schools. if (WIDGETBOX) WIDGETBOX.renderWidget('d313643b-e81f-4c87-82f6-f5af275ba98f');Get the Edweek.org: Schools & Stimulus widget and many other great free widgets at Widgetbox! Just click on the grey "Get Widget" tab, above, and copy and paste the code into your blog or Web site. It's easy! Our crack Web team has already posted a ...


As I learned from my story about open content licensing, there's a lot of confusion on the part of both teachers and students about copyright law. The Internet in particular has made copyright even more difficult to figure out, since it's so easy to copy information, pictures, music, and other forms of multimedia, whether it's legal or not. That's why I was particularly excited to get the announcement from the American Library Association's Office for Information Technology Policy and the American Association of School Libraries (AASL), in partnership with the National Council of Teachers of English, about new copyright lesson ...


There's been a lot of debate about the role of personal technologies in schools, particularly cell phones and text devices. Schools generally try to prohibit students from phoning and texting when they are supposed to be listening in class. So what kind of role models are these lawmakers who were Twittering during President Obama's State of the Union address? Dana Milbank's columns in The Washington Post are always entertaining, and offer unique insights into the inner workings of Congress. Today's piece is a commentary on lawmakers' preoccupation with the 140-character messages they were sending to their "followers" on Twitter, questioning ...


One segment of the K-12 population that I think is sometimes forgotten about by ed-tech folks (and I admit: I'm guilty of it as well) is the "little folks" as Tammy Worcester, author of several books about computer activities for K-3 students, would say. The last session I attended at NCCE was her talk on "Computer Activities for Little Folks," which went through many suggestions of activities that could be used for K-3 students. I'm not going to go through everything she talked about—like the greeting cards or mini-books she showed us how to make through PowerPoint—but she ...


As I mentioned before, I attended two sessions at the NCCE conference last week that were great. The first session I went to, which was standing-room-only, was about open-source tools and content for teachers by Karen Fasimpur. She spent the first part of her talk explaining the different licenses that are available to create open resources, something that I wrote about awhile ago after I realized how much confusion was out there about those licenses. She then went on to talk about how open licensed content can be used in the classroom and where educators could find those resources. Check ...


Working from home can be isolating at times, and it's always a treat when I can get out of the house and talk with real, live people about ed-tech issues, which is what I spent all day Friday doing at the Northwest Council for Computer Education's "Navigating the New World With Technology" conference here in Portland. The conference opened with a keynote address from Debra Pickering, author of several books about teaching and learning that she's co-authored with Robert Marzano. Pickering addressed a couple of issues that I hear about over and over as I talk to teachers who are ...


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