This blog item I found via @berkshirecat, a New England teacher who I follow on Twitter, is a letter to teachers who are loathe to use technology. The writer, Patrick Higgins, makes a snide case for the way technology helps teachers break out of what he implies to be unproductive or counterproductive traditions. He includes reasons for his shared loathing of technology, mimicking the subconscious complaints he imagines his change-fearing colleagues make for avoiding tech-integration in their classrooms. "The fact that there will be conversations about topics in my class that occur UNABATED and not in my presence is inconceivable ...


Digital textbooks are back in the news, with the release of a new, larger-screened Kindle by Amazon.com, which could be suitable for digital textbooks, but there are still obstacles that stand in the way of e-textbooks taking off—such as a lack of awareness about them.


Ed-tech proponents were dismayed to learn of the cuts to the Enhancing Education Through Technology (EETT) program proposed in President Obama's budget. Four organizations promoting the use of effective technologies in schools released a statement yesterday urging more money, not less, for the flagship federal ed-tech program. Obama's budget proposal would slash funding from $269 million to just $100 million. In the stimulus package, the program received $650 million in additional funding. The program had been slated for elimination by the Bush administration, and its funding was progressively cut over the last eight years. The stimulus money brought the program’s...


It turns out I'm not the only Katie blogging about technology in education on edweek.org. We've just launched a new blog, Teaching Generation Tech, written by Katie Hanifin, a teacher at Canastota High School in upstate New York. She's blogging about her experiences as a teacher, trying to bridge the gap between modern technology and the classroom. It's refreshing to hear about the ways that technology can help, and hinder, instruction through the eyes of a teacher, rather than just from researchers or academics. Like this post, which talks about cell phones that repeatedly go off during class despite ...


I got pretty excited this week when I surpassed 100 followers for my @kmanzo account on Twitter, and then again when the numbers started to ratchet up. But then my enthusiasm turned to wariness when a Twitter user named Stalker started following me. I chided myself for the skepticism when I realized Craig Stalker is a legitimate member with seemingly valid intentions. Even though he's not an educator, I found many of his posts informative, so I followed him back. It was only when I started getting a swift stream of female followers with cute user IDs—each including their...


Although concerns about the swine flu are subsiding, I've been very impressed by the role technology has played in keeping students, teachers, parents, and administrators connected during this unexpected break for some students and teachers. My colleague Michelle Davis and I talked to several school districts and disaster preparedness experts about the ways that technology can help ensure a continuity of education for this story that appeared on edweek.org. Since then, I've come across several stories about districts tapping their already existing or makeshift technological infrastructures to keep kids engaged in their studies. Take Michael Sanderson, for example, who ...


This article by the Asia Society, which aims to strengthen relationships between Asian countries and the U.S. and promote greater understanding of Asian culture and history, gives a number of tips to educators on how to use technology to increase global awareness in the classroom. The many resources available on the Web make it easier than ever before to connect with individuals around the globe, examine current events from multiple cultural perspectives, and tap into a global network of information, says the article. The Internet has also made it possible for students' work to be accessed by a global ...


May has just started, and I'm already starting to hear more and more about the National Education Computing Conference coming up this summer. NECC, which is hosted by the International Society for Technology in Education, is taking place this year in Washington from June 28-July 1. And yes, I will be flying back to the East Coast to attend. In fact, all the DDers will be at the conference—covering the goings on and learning more about the latest trends in ed tech. I've never been to NECC before, and I'm very excited to attend this year. For you veteran ...


No one should be surprised to learn that today's young people have a different sense of workplace behavior than, say, Baby Boomers. But this survey, which I learned about at the Read Write Web blog, shows just how vast is the divide between the kinds of work habits, skills, and tools people of various age groups find efficient and appropriate. "The generation gap at work is really wide with vast discrepancies when it comes to what the appropriate use of technology is - a problem that leads to increasing tensions in the workplace," Sarah Perez writes in her blog post. ...


Mary Ann Zehr, my colleague over at Curriculum Matters, has posted a reminder about today's Ed Week chat on International Comparison tests, and a bit of analysis about the issue. She also has a link to the McKinsey report everyone is talking about. Mary Ann, Sean Cavanagh, and I have a series of stories in this week's paper about the growing interest among policymakers here in analyzing the successes of other countries, as related to the international assessments. We have reports on reform efforts in Australia, Slovenia, and South Korea. Her report is here. The OECD, which oversees the PISA, ...


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