To round out my recent posts on disruptive innovation in K-12 education, I want to point out the Disrupting Class blog, for the book of the same name. Michael B. Horn, one of the authors of the book, which is subtitled How Disruptive Innovation Will Change the Way the World Learns, is tracking ways in which developments in real schools and communities are backing up the book's theory and analysis. His latest posts are about disruption in higher education, as a theme in the presidential campaign, and in education overseas. Horn is a Harvard Business School graduate who started researching ...


Hello from Seattle, where I am reporting from the National School Board Association's T+L Conference. So far since I've been here, I've picked up the new copy of Digital Directions, talked with several ed-tech companies about the newest products on the market today, and brainstormed about the educational value of using cell phones and other mobile technologies in the classroom with chief technology officers from around the country at the Consortium for School Networking's CTO Forum. In addition to a panel discussion about how those mobile technologies can successfully be used in the classroom, COSN launched two new initiatives ...


Good discussion about "disruptive innovation" this week featuring Disrupting Class co-authors Clayton M. Christensen and Michael B. Horn, at the American Enterprise Institute, in Washington. They made a powerful case that the fate that afflicted manufacturers of minicomputers, vacuum tube radios, and proprietary high-end software, is likely, in the next couple of decades, to be coming to a school district near you. You can read my story about the discussion here. By the way, Checker Finn, conservative education expert and pundit, who was the official "responder and raconteur" at the session and generally supported the co-authors' thesis, confessed that he ...


Tomorrow, I'll be traveling north a few hours from my home in Portland to attend the T+L Conference, sponsored by the National School Boards Association, in Seattle. While I'm there, I'll keep you updated by blogging here on Digital Education and Twittering, so stayed tuned. And for those of you who can't make it to the conference, there's an online chat taking place at the conference about one of my favorite subjects—educational gaming in the classroom—hosted by Julie Evans of Project Tomorrow on NSBA's Web site. It's scheduled for Tuesday, October 28 at 1pm Pacific time, and ...


A panel discussion today at the American Enterprise Institute, in Washington, will feature Clayton M. Christensen, the Harvard Business School professor and the lead author of Disrupting Class: How Disruptive Innovation Will Change the Way the World Learns. He will give an address, which will be followed by a discussion with Christensen and one of his two coauthors, Michael B. Horn, of Innosight Institute, as well as education expert Chester E. Finn Jr., the president of the Thomas B. Fordham Institute. It will be interesting to learn how Checker Finn and Frederick M. Hess, AEI's education policy expert who will ...


If you are tracking the rise of virtual schooling, you’ll find the best current information about the growth and maturing of this new way of teaching and learning in “Keeping Pace With K-12 Online Learning: A Review of State-Level Policy and Practice,” sponsored by 10 groups and companies in the industry, including the North American Council for Online Learning. The fifth annual edition of the report, released Oct. 23, gives evidence that growth continues apace, though not uniformly. Programs that are supplemental to students' enrollment in regular school are growing fastest overall, with one in three increasing enrollment by ...


NetTrekker d.i.—a company that provides an educational search engine for schools—recently released its list of top 100 school districts that keep students safest as they search. The title of the rankings is somewhat misleading, as the criterion for determining the safest school district was based solely upon the amount of time districts spent using the netTrekker software, but it does point to an overall trend in ed-tech to keep students safe online. As students become more and more plugged in and technology savvy, teaching them how to use the Internet appropriately is becoming a bigger issue for ...


Video lessons aiming to help high schoolers succeed in AP-level courses and to give them an edge on college admissions tests are the main offerings of an online startup that debuted this week. San Francisco-based Brightstorm Inc. has rolled out an initial set of 20 courses, each consisting of about 15 “episodes,” or instructional units of from 8 to 15 minutes long. The courses, which cover a range of AP subjects as well as SAT- and ACT-Prep, are supplementary. They assume that students are taking the conventional course in a classroom or perhaps online. But in each video course, a “rock...


Vint Cerf, who is often called the "father of the Internet" for his contribution to creating its technical protocols and architecture, will have a hand in developing a framework for the first nationwide technology literacy assessment of U.S. students, as part of the National Assessment of Educational Progress. That's the inside scoop from Steven A. Schneider, of WestEd, which on Oct. 6 was awarded the contract by the National Assessment Governing Board to develop the framework and specifications for the test. The assessment, which will be first offered on a pilot basis in 2012, will be "totally computer-based," Schneider, ...


I just finished reading Andrew's post about T.H.E. Journal's endorsement of Sen. Obama, which dovetails nicely with the DD poll about which presidential candidate would do more for ed-tech. Take a minute to weigh in on who you think would be the best ed-tech president....


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