I wasn't able to make it to the CoSN conference in Austin this week, but Andrew Trotter, a blogger and former Ed Week reporter was there. He's been posting his observations on his new blog. He has this report from yesterday: There's been "near-constant discussion at CoSN about Twitter, Facebook, blogging, podcasting, Wikipedia, open content, curriculum wikis, online video games, and smartphones–and how those Web 2.0 tools fit together with the traditional school staples of assessment, curriculum, student privacy, and safety, budgets, and so on," Andrew writes. "The international symposium on March 10, here in Austin, made clear ...


Hat tip to Remote Access for turning me on to a new publication put out by MIT press called the International Journal of Learning and Media


As we ask ourselves questions about social networking, mobile technologies, online learning, and other emerging technological concerns, it's important to remember that not all school districts in this country are all that far along technologically. In fact, many schools, as well as businesses and homes, are still struggling to secure stable, high-speed broadband connections, as this report, released by the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation, reminds us. The report calls for a renewed focus on getting all Americans hooked up to high-speed broadband Internet. The number of Americans connected to broadband has increased dramatically since the beginning of the decade, ...


Sean Cavanagh, my colleague over the Curriculum Matters blog, has this report from the National Assessment Governing Board meeting: There's a lot of debate these days about how to define "technology literacy," but in a couple years, the National Assessment of Educational Progress will take the unusual step of testing students in those skills. This week, the panel that oversees the National Assessment of Educational Progress heard an early report on how it is attempting to forge a working definition, in preparation for judging students' tech literacy in 2012. The National Assessment Governing Board, which sets policy for the NAEP, ...


Florida instituted new rules to prevent cyberbullying this school year, with clear procedures for reporting it, even anonymously, and detailed consequences for perpetrators, according to this article in the St. Petersburg Times. The article highlights the extra steps being taken in the Pinellas and Hillsborough districts to head off online bullies and stalkers. More and more districts are taking cyberbullying, and prevention of this type of harassment, seriously. A federal law passed in the fall, in fact, requires schools that receive E-rate funding to have an education campaign about such online behaviors. But most schools and districts are still trying ...


I'm currently digging up lots of research for a story I'm writing for Education Week about the role of games—like video games, computer games, and simulations—in the classroom. Last week, I came across two white papers, published by Education Arcade, a research initiative on gaming and school primarily by researchers from MIT. The first one, Moving Learning Games Forward, is one of the most comprehensive reports I've read about the challenges that schools face when introducing games into the classroom and the differences between games and formal education that make it challenging to integrate the two in a ...


I've joined LinkedIn and Facebook. I blog and Twitter. I've hosted Web chats, downloaded and posted video, and I've even fiddled a bit with wikis and podcasts. But I'm still wondering if all this has been an effective way to reach Ed Week and Digital Directions readers. According to McKinsey & Co., many companies are wondering the same thing. In the February edition of the McKinsey Quarterly, the business journal of the global management-consulting company, there are some tips for making Web 2.0 work for you. The second generation of Web usage is all about communication and collaboration, as well ...


In this Ed Week article I look at educational television and the latest efforts to study its impact on children's literacy development. Yesterday I came across this study, by the Children's Hospital of Boston and Harvard Medical School, that concludes "TV viewing before the age of 2 does not improve a child's language and visual motor skills." The longitudinal study of children from birth to age 3, published in the March issue of Pediatrics, didn't measure any detrimental affects of television viewing. But the researchers say there are other indications that children younger than 2 should not watch television, which ...


The Consortium for School Networking, the Washington-based association for school district technology leaders, has revamped its Web site to include more interactive tools and social networking features. Two new forums, for example, will launch this week to allow educators to discuss the impact of technology on K-12 classrooms, as well as new and innovative applications for educational technology. The organization also hosts blogs, social networks, and a resource library of ed tech materials, reports, and surveys. CoSN's is hosting its annual conference next week in Austin, and we will be blogging from there about the latest tech trends, concerns, and ...


A couple weeks back, Education Sector released a new report about the role of technology in assessment. The report, "Beyond the Bubble: Technology and the Future of Student Assessment," talked about how technology could be used to automate assessments to provide quicker feedback. But it also looked at how it could help transform assessment to provide meaningful data on students' test answers and, perhaps more importantly, how they got them. From today through Thursday, Education Sector is hosting a discussion about the report with its author, Bill Tucker, as well as education experts Charles Barone, Margaret Honey, and Scott Marion. ...


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