An Education Week Twitter chat explores how digital learning games are being used in the classroom.


Studies presented at the American Educational Research Association on iPads and early literacy, students' online reading skills, Google Docs, and the frontiers of ed-tech use drew big reactions from readers.


Common Sense Media is working with over 20 districts to establish a rating system for the privacy policies and security of ed-tech products.


Greg Toppo of USA Today, Richard Culatta of the U.S. education department, and Michael Levine of the Joan Ganz Cooney Center will talk digital learning games during a Ed Week Twitter chat Thursday evening.


An online learning organization has entered into a settlement agreement after a Department of Justice review concludes that the provider's digital content and website are not accessible for students with disabilities.


Republican Orrin Hatch and Democrat Tammy Baldwin support the inclusion of an amendment to the ESEA that would encourage the use of "open educational resources."


Nearly 60 percent of high schoolers report using their own mobile devices at schools, compared with just 32 percent who said they're using school-issued laptops, according to a new survey.


Future of Privacy Forum released a new guide to help parents better understand current student-data-privacy laws and their rights when it comes to their child's education information.


President Obama announced new ConnectED initiatives to provide $250 million in free e-books to students and meant to give all students in 30 communities a library card.


Common Sense Media announced the launch of a $20 million national education-advocacy effort that the organization's CEO says is meant to make it an "AARP for kids" in terms of its reach.


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