President Obama announced new ConnectED initiatives to provide $250 million in free e-books to students and meant to give all students in 30 communities a library card.


Common Sense Media announced the launch of a $20 million national education-advocacy effort that the organization's CEO says is meant to make it an "AARP for kids" in terms of its reach.


Changes to the new Student Digital Privacy and Parental Rights Act have won over some educator groups, but raised concerns from the ed-tech industry.


States are making significant progress in digital education efforts, with over 400 digital learning policies implemented in 2014, new ExcelinEd report finds.


A revamped federal student-data-privacy bill would cover more student information, allow fewer uses of that data, and impose new requirements on ed-tech vendors.


Fourteen states are now mandating that computer science classes be counted towards high school graduation requirements, a new report from Education Commission of the States finds.


State superintendent Dale Erquiaga said Nevada's test providers "have failed to uphold their obligations."


Nearly a quarter of teens are online "almost constantly" and 73 percent of teens own smartphones, according to a new Pew Research Center survey.


The American Institutes for Research, which was awarded a $220 million contract to oversee the assessments, accepted responsibility for the latest problems.


Although it's just a first step, bipartisan support for the "I-TECH" amendment by the Senate Education Committee is seen as positive by ed-tech advocates.


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