The prospect of an Internet "slow lane" for ed-tech companies that don't "pay to play" raises four areas of concern for these organizations.


Today's FCC report shows how additional E-rate funding will affect students, schools, and libraries in all 50 states over the next five years.


Maker education is a hot topic at ISTE, where educators and authors Sylvia Martinez and Gary Stager discussed their new book "Invent to Learn."


One of the most crowded sessions at the ISTE 2014 conference: "Five Critical Mistakes Schools Make With iPads (and How to Correct Them)."


The LAUSD schools will let some schools test laptops instead of iPads, change the way it deploys devices, and overhaul its approach to letting students take devices home.


The use of technology, including "bring-your-own-device" programs, is increasingly common in K-12 schools, but significant needs remain, according to the Software & Information Industry Association.


Companies large and small try to convince K-12 schools to buy their products in the massive exhibit hall at ISTE's 2014 gathering in Atlanta.


Six groups representing rural school superintendents and practitioners are calling the Federal Communications Commission's plan to overhaul the E-rate program "a disappointment."


Indiana's state education department launched online "communities of practice" to help teachers transition from the Common Core to new state standards.


Erik Martin, who will be a junior at the University of Maryland, will advise the federal agency's on seeking student input on ed-tech issues.


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