Devices and apps have evolved since 2010, probably more quickly than parents' strategies for monitoring teens' digital usage and regulating teens' digital access as a form of discipline.


At a tour of NASA's space camp in Huntsville, Ala., the education secretary put the spotlight on the science, technology, engineering, and math fields.


More students are using mobile devices for schoolwork, but just one in six U.S. schoolchildren attends a school that provides all student with their laptop or tablet, according to a new survey from Pearson.


A 2009 lawsuit filed by the ACLU highlighted a still-evolving legal issue: When can school administrators search students' cellphones and social media accounts?


Los Angeles schools chief John Deasy fired back at critics questioning the integrity of the process behind a $30 million contract with Apple and Pearson.


A 1989 report on schools' technology planning featured some long-forgotten devices and terminology, but many familiar concerns.


Perceived conflicts of interest, possible manipulation in the bidding process, and questions about Pearson's curriculum are addressed in a review of the L.A. school system's iPad purchase.


The curriculum, released this week, is the first in a series of lessons and resources to be released by the nonprofit over the next 18 months.


Schools Superintendent John Deasy said the district will launch a new bidding process and "no longer utilize our current contract" with Apple.


David Wiley, a supporter of open-educational resources, argues that the free materials easily top commercial resources when judged by "learning outcomes per dollar."


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