Digital Education looks back at the big stories in 1-to-1 computing in 2013, starting with the troubles surrounding the massive iPad rollout in Los Angeles.


In his last press conference of 2013, President Obama cited his digital education agenda as an effort that will go forward without the need for congressional approval.


Two companies have launched new algorithm-based screening tools they believe can predict the impact teacher candidates will have on student performance.


The cable and Internet provider Comcast will partner with Khan Academy, a major source of open resources, in an attempt to boost needy students' access to the Internet and online learning resources.


More school districts are relying on cloud-computing services, but they have not put in place safeguards for protecting students' personal information, a study finds.


The Los Angeles Board of Education is set to vote on a proposal that would delay elements of the country's largest 1-to-1 student computing initiative.


Science Leadership Academy Principal Christopher Lehmann argues that new Chromebooks are a cost-effective solution to going 1-to-1 and supporting project-based learning.


Rates of student completions of "MOOCs" offered through the University of Pennsylvania and Coursera ranged from 2 percent to 14 percent, research shows.


Eric Sheninger, the principal of New Milford High School in New Jersey, is known for his innovative use of social networking in education. His new book for education leaders on the topic, "Digital Leadership: Changing Paradigms for Changing Times," comes out Jan. 14.


Foundations supported by Mark Zuckerberg and Bill Gates are lending their backing to a nonprofit focused on improving high-speed broadband in schools.


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