August 2014 Archives

The transportation plan includes a shuttle bus service for some students and maps showing safe walking routes.


A group of 14 districts is asking the state to pay the $115 million they say they have been owed since fiscal year 2010.


After an emotional, three-hour hearing, the Lee County school district becomes the first to refuse to participate in state-mandated testing.


The Large Countywide and Suburban District Consortium, which represents 16 districts across the country, applauded Education Secretary Arne Duncan's recent statement that there is too much focus on standardized testing in the nation's schools.


The district's emergency manager reversed course after the measure was criticized by both teachers and the state education superintendent. The pay cut was part of the most recent deficit-reduction plan the district submitted to the state.


A group of Arkansas school districts are bound by a desegregation agreement to follow a 1989 state law that has since been declared unconstitutional. What happens next?


The school district, which serves about 11,200 students, postponed opening because of the protests following the death of Michael Brown, the 18-year-old black teenager who was shot by a white police officer.


The school board was expected to choose between two candidates this week, but could not muster the five-vote super-majority needed to hire and fire a superintendent. It's back to the drawing board.


The Philadelphia Education Research Consortium, funded through a three-year grant from the William Penn Foundation, will provide research and analyses on education issues in the city. It will be a partnership between Research for Action, three of the city's research universities, and the city's regular and charter schools.


The police force for the nation's second largest school district aims to drive down its high rates of citations and arrests of students who fight at school, get caught with tobacco or alcohol, and other minor offenses.


Officials cited continuing unrest in the city, following the death of an 18-year-old unarmed African-American man, in deciding again to postpone the start of the school year.


As unrest continues in the St. Louis suburb, three of four public school districts in the area, citing concern for students' and families' safety, decided to keep their doors closed to students on Monday.


Winston Brooks quit after six years at the helm. He'll receive a $350,000 buyout and a pledge that the results of an investigation into a "serious personnel issue" will not be made public.


Among the cuts: About 7,500 high school students who live within two miles of school will not have district-provided transportation. They will have to find alternative ways to get there.


As a state investigation into cheating allegations continue, Dennis Dupree, Sr., the superintendent in Clarksdale, Miss., says his district's academic improvements are the result of hard work.


In new report cards released this week—which added the scores of more than 1,500 students—the ratings for 20 Columbus City Schools were lowered.


Updated: Schools in Ferguson, Mo., have delayed the first day of school as the community continues to grapple with a police shooting of an unarmed teen there.


A new report from the Fordham Institute shows that between 1970 and 2010 non-teaching staff—a category that includes teacher aides, counselors, school psychologists, transportation workers, and nurses—grew by 130 percent, with teacher aides leading the pack.


The district's decision follows the news that a Florida man at the center of a Major League Baseball steroid scandal admitted he had also provided performance-enhancing drugs to high school athletes.


The district has asked the Nevada Department of Education to grant temporary licenses to teachers who need additional time to meet state certification, but the state has so far balked at the request.


The Jennings school district cancelled school Monday after a night of looting and riots in the area, sparked by a police shooting of an unarmed African-American teen.


The 12 defendants include former teachers, principals, administrators, and testing coordinators. The trial is expected to last at least three months.


The four teachers—who had not been named—will be paid one year's salary as part of the package. They also get to walk away with a clean record for not challenging their firings. The cheating investigation started after students at Jefferson Elementary School posted double-digit gains on state exams.


The district lost its accreditation in 2012 after test scores plummeted. While test scores remain low, the state education commissioner cited improvements in recommending that the district be awarded provisional accreditation.


The $265 million is essentially an advance on money the district was already scheduled to receive during the year. Even so, schools Superintendent William Hite gave no assurances that schools will open on time and renewed his call for state legislators to pass the $2-per-pack cigarette tax to plug the funding gap.


Superintendent John Deasy issues a personal appeal to district leaders to keep tabs on one struggling student at risk of dropping out.


A decade after Katrina, a new report points to significant academic growth and more collaboration among the different New Orleans public school systems. But it also raises concerns about sustaining student-performance gains and possible fallout from political disagreements at the local and state levels.


Memphis-area suburban communities moved to form their own school districts in the wake of the merger of the Shelby County, Tenn., district with the financially-strapped city school system in 2011.


The former District of Columbia schools chancellor returns to the Sacramento charter school organization known as St. Hope Public Schools.


Washoe County Superintendent Pedro Martinez is suing the school board and district after he was unexpectedly fired last month and then told to return to the job a week later.


At least 60 former and current administrators have received subpoenas in connection to the district's attendance-rigging scandal.


A 150-page report by a task force on truancy in Chicago Public Schools proposed wide ranging reforms on both the local and state levels to cut absenteeism in Chicago Public Schools.


Revenue from a 15 percent excise tax on marijuana sales flows into special grant funds to help districts pay for construction projects and to hire more health professionals.


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