December 2014 Archives

Among the most read posts in 2014 were stories about principals and school leadership, a backlash against standardized testing, the fallout from a police shooting of an unarmed teen in Ferguson, Mo., and school funding issues in Philadelphia.


A tentative agreement between the city, the school district, and the teachers' union could eventually lead to longer school days for more than 20,000 students.


In an order issued Friday, President Judge Stephen P. Linebaugh placed the struggling district in receivership for three years, beginning immediately. The receiver, David Meckley, has proposed that an outside charter management organization run all of the schools.


A local judge is expected to rule on whether to appoint a receiver to oversee the district, which could lead the district to turn over school operations to a charter-management organization.


Having wrapped up its 11th week, the long-running trial will resume Jan. 5, but the judge told jurors it could run until April.


Citing concerns over technological readiness, LA Superintendent Raymond Cortines has asked the state Superintendent of Public Instruction Thomas Torlakson not to use the district's students' test scores on new Smarter Balanced tests for "high stakes accountability purposes."


The suit claims the state of Michigan and Highland Park school district failed to provide an adequate education for students.


A federal lawsuit filed today by the ACLU alleges that school board elections in Ferguson keep blacks "all but locked out of the political process."


The recently approved federal spending measure includes language that highlights the increasing responsibilities of principals in meeting new mandates and the need for training to accomplish them.


The district has been without a permanent superintendent for two and a half years.


The Minneapolis school board approved Superintendent Bernadeia Johnson's resignation late Tuesday, paving the way for her to leave the 34,000-student district.


The special issue highlights school district leaders that are engaging in innovative approaches to improve their schools.


In the 10th week of the Atlanta test-cheating trial, witnesses testified that some teachers threatened students who reported cheating, or told students that they were "just dumb."


In a column printed in the Philadelphia Inquirer Friday, the Education Secretary says the nation should be embarrassed that the quality of children's public education is largely dependent on where they live and their parents' incomes.


A local judge is hearing arguments on whether the state can appoint a receiver for the financially-strapped district which could become the first in Pennsylvania to have all of its schools turned over to a for-profit charter school operator.


New research shows that 14 percent of freshmen in the city school system are expected to earn a four-year degree by the age of 25, up from 8 percent in 2006.


The findings show that while 98 percent of the participating organizations support diversity, only 33 percent describe it as a core value and even fewer have a clear definition of what it means.


The vote this week by the state's Board of Education gets rid of a state requirement and leaves decisions about staffing in those areas up to the local school districts.


With the suburbs around Hartford growing increasingly segregated, school officials are struggling to ensure that more students are attending school in a racially integrated setting.


The nine-year deal will offer financial incentives to principals who take assignments in struggling schools and provide bonuses to principals who coach and advise their peers.


The judge suggested a compromise in the ninth week of the trial of 12 former Atlanta educators who are accused of inflating students' scores and covering up the cheating on state tests.


The National Association of Secondary School Principals says that "Value-Added Measurements" should not be used to make decisions regarding retention, firing and compensation for principals and teachers.


The Council of the Great City Schools said the grand jury decision in the Michael Brown case is not just about the local police and community, but more broadly "about how America's institutions, including our schools, respect the rights, well-being and futures of all our young people."


Mr. Leeds and his wife founded the Alliance for Excellent Education and Institute for Student Achievement, advocacy groups with the goal of shining a spotlight on the nation's at-risk secondary students.


Twenty boxes of documents related to the district's troubled $1.3-billion program to provide iPads to all students were taken from the district on Monday, amid reports that the FBI was conducting a criminal investigation into the program.


As students return to their St. Louis-area schools a week after the grand jury decision in the Michael Brown shooting death, educators are prepared to discuss race relations, police practices, and other tough questions.


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