« Are Schools' Discipline Policies Linked to Shootings? We Just Don't Know | Main | Reopening Schools: Here Are Some Districts' Plans for the Fall »

Here's What Districts' PPE Shopping Lists Look Like This Fall. It's Not Cheap

As politicians continue to ramp up pressure to reopen schools, administrators are attempting to figure out how they're going to afford all the Personal Protective Equipment they'll need for students and staff heading back amid the COVID-19 Pandemic.

With the recent uptick in coronavirus infections, there's another PPE shortage, which means the prices in the coming weeks, as schools decide whether to reopen their buildings, could tick up. 

AASA, the School Superintendents Association, estimates school districts will collectively spend close to $25 billion on PPE this fall. Costs for masks, nursing gowns, gloves and other PP vary widely for districts based on a range of factors, including local conditions and state requirements.  Some states, such as California and Texas, have purchased equipment for the schools.

So what's the outlook for a specific district? Patrick Miller, the superintendent of Greene County schools in Snow Hill, N.C., estimated purchasing all the equipment it needs will cost his district more than $600,000.

Click here to download a list of what districts in North Carolina have been advised by the state's health department to purchase this fall.  The state has not provided districts with any extra money to buy the PPE.

Notice: We recently upgraded our comments. (Learn more here.) If you are logged in as a subscriber or registered user and already have a Display Name on edweek.org, you can post comments. If you do not already have a Display Name, please create one here.
Ground Rules for Posting
We encourage lively debate, but please be respectful of others. Profanity and personal attacks are prohibited. By commenting, you are agreeing to abide by our user agreement.
All comments are public.

Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Most Viewed on Education Week

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments