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Spellings Creates Pilot Project to Differentiate Consequences

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Ten states will get the opportunity to restructure their intervention in schools that aren't making AYP under the "differentiated accountability" proposal Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings announced this morning in St. Paul, Minn.

The Department of Education will set up a peer review process to evaluate states' proposals to provide consequences based on how close they are to making their AYP goals, with schools that are farthest away getting the most dramatic interventions. Spelling said the process will be "very similar" to the one in which the department evaluated the growth model pilot program.

In her speech, Spellings said the department would favor states that "have been pioneers for reform," identifying Maryland, North Dakota, Louisiana, and South Dakota as such states.

Here is a fact sheet on the pilot project. An here is an Associated Press story based on an interview with Spellings that was written before this morning's speech.

Updates to come later today.

1 Comment

I understand the political implications and inferences being made about NCLB, but what impact is NCLB having on new jobs being created in the US? What impact is NCLB having on jobs being outsourced to third worlds because the labor is cheaper? How does NCLB impact our nation's reliance on other countries to produce medical doctors because we focus on math and reading?
How does NCLB impact other economic and/or social concerns for US citizens?
Perhaps taking a more holistic approach to "fixing" the education process in the US might be too much work, but I sure would like to see a politician give it a try.

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