« Darling-Hammond's Views Will Be Part of Testing Debate | Main | Future of Rules, NEA Case to Be Decided Soon »

Miller Made Imprint on NCLB

| 6 Comments

When people criticize NCLB for being unfair to schools, they point their fingers at President Bush and Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings. But, as my retrospective look at the Bush presidency points out, Rep. George Miller, D-Calif., had a significant role in making NCLB's accountability rules as tough as they are.

Bush's initial NCLB proposal would have required schools to set up schools to make AYP goals for all students and specifically for low-income students. They also would have needed to report the progress of students in minority groups and categories such as special education students and English-language learners. But the final bill required schools to meet AYP goals for all categories to avoid accountability sanctions.

That requirement was essentially the same as an amendment that Miller and Rep. Dale Kildee, D-Mich., offered in 1999 when Congress was working on reauthorizing ESEA, former Miller aide Charles Barone told me. (That comment didn't make my piece for space reasons.)

"While Miller and Kildee lost that battle [in 1999], what they did was set the stage for an alliance between top congressional Democrats and Bush ... to do something powerful and constructive to focus attention and resources on the nationā€˜s most vulnerable children," Barone wrote in a 2007 paper for Democrats for Education Reform.

By 2007, Miller had adopted the mantra that NCLB "is not fair, not flexible, and is not funded." He offered a proposal to add multiple measures to the accountability system. Spellings complained that it would have "watered down" accountability; others said the changes would have made the law too complicated.

As Tom Toch and I pointed out earlier, we're in for a major debate about the future of federal accountability rules. At the heart of the debate is the following question: Is there a fair way to hold schools accountable for the individual performance of their entire population as well as of students in a variety of demographic categories?

If you have the answer, you may want to publish it.

6 Comments

I believe the Forum on Educational Accountability has done so, starting with the Joint Organizational Statement on No Child Left Behind (now with 149 national groups endorsing it) and continuing with two reports, legislative language and various summaries. See www.edaccountability.org.

In ultra brief, we call for use of multiple sources of evidence, disaggregated; a reasonable timeline, including for groups; assistance based on actual analysis of information instead of automatic triggers; and stronger interventions if a school does not make progress on the multiple outcome indicators or on taking reasonable improvement steps.

Monty Neill
Chair, Forum on Educational Accountability

Monty -

Define terms like "multiple," "reasonable," "actual," "automatic," and "stronger" and I think you're all set.

Good luck.

--- Charlie

What a sham. This is how the public is kept distracted while these destroyers of true education (single world order types) sitting around an oak desk thousands of miles from the schools they control keep students from the knowledge base they need to survive in the future and to do what they are told without using their own brains. There will be no progress in education until the US Dept. Of Ed. is eliminated and the Feds get out of education and we stop following UN Education For All.
JR

What a sham. This is how the public is kept distracted while these destroyers of true education (single world order types) sitting around an oak desk thousands of miles from the schools they control keep students from the knowledge base they need to survive in the future and to do what they are told without using their own brains. There will be no progress in education until the US Dept. Of Ed. is eliminated and the Feds get out of education and we stop following UN Education For All.
JR

You ask: Is there a fair way to hold schools accountable for the individual performance of their entire population as well as of students in a variety of demographic categories?

Why not ACTUALLY ask all of the customers, i.e. the primary stakeholders, the parents/guardians if they are satisfied with their child's education process? After all, we are the constituents that vote these folks into congress, right?

Charlie, please read the texts on the website, including our draft language and our responses to the Miller-McKeon draft, and tell me if you think they are defined. Monty Neill

Comments are now closed for this post.

Advertisement

Recent Comments

  • Monty Neill: Charlie, please read the texts on the website, including our read more
  • Kathy: You ask: Is there a fair way to hold schools read more
  • James Rugg: What a sham. This is how the public is kept read more
  • James Rugg: What a sham. This is how the public is kept read more
  • Charles Barone: Monty - Define terms like "multiple," "reasonable," "actual," "automatic," and read more

Archives

Technorati

Technorati search

» Blogs that link here