January 2009 Archives

Over at the Quick and the Ed, Robert Manwaring asks an important question about the Title I money in the stimulus package: How would cash-strapped districts comply with the program's "supplement, not supplant" rule? As I pointed out yesterday, the stimulus bill would give Title I $13 billion—almost as much as it received in fiscal 2008. The rule is designed to ensure that districts aren't using federal dollars to offset state and local cuts. That doesn't appear to be possible in the current fiscal climate and may require some "fancy accounting" if the rule is in effect for stimulus...


Alyson Klein provides an extensive summary of the $100 billion for education in the Democratic economic stimulus package. You also can read the House Appropriations Committee's 13-page summary. Three things to note about NCLB: 1.) The package would give $13 billion for districts in the Title I program. That's almost the same as the $13.9 billion the program received for all of fiscal 2008. Under NCLB, the program was authorized to receive $25 billion in fiscal 2007—the last year the law provided an authorization level for its programs. 2.) The stimulus bill also would set aside $300 million...


In The Washington Post today, Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings tells her prospective successor to keep NCLB. If you've heard her speak in the past two years, you wouldn't learn anything new. Test scores are up, she writes, especially among poor and minority children. The backlash against NCLB's accountability rules, she writes, "speak[s] to the harsh truths it reveals." NCLB can be improved, she says, and she's all for it. But she doesn't want to undermine its "core accountability provisions," she writes. She doesn't say it, but from past statements, she probably means the goal for universal proficiency by ...


Joel Packer, the NEA's spokesman on NCLB, is getting ready to end his tenure at the union after 25 years. Packer announced to NEA staff earlier this week that he would leave the union at the end of April. In a phone conversation with me today, he said it was time to do something new. He expects to remain active in the education policy world. He said he may start his own advocacy firm, or he may join another organization or lobbying firm. He says he'll decide once he leaves NEA. As the NEA's director of policy and practice, Packer ...


Has NCLB improved the targeting of money toward low-income students? I went round and round and round on that question with John See, Kevin Carey, and Michael Dannenberg back in December 2007. All of it was based on the reporting for this story. I think the answer we came up could be summarized by saying: Yes, but not by much. This week, the Department of Education released a report reinforcing that conclusion. In "State and Local Implementation of the No Child Left Behind Act: Volume VI—Targeting and Uses of Federal Education Funds," the American Institutes for Research reports that ...


In addition to President George W. Bush's speech and Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings' "Great Expectations" document, the Bush administration has released a series of policy announcements on the 7th anniversary of NCLB. • Spellings has approved the growth models of Colorado, Minnesota, Pennsylvania, and Texas. Now, 15 states are using the growth models. •Spellings has added Arkansas, Louisiana, and New York to the differentiated accountability pilot program. That brings the total number of states to nine. (No link available yet.) •Spellings has sent every state an update on where they stand on the "cornerstones" of NCLB: Testing, accountability,...


President George Bush gave the last policy speech of his presidency today. The topic was the same as his first such speech: NCLB. In it, he repeated many arguments for the law, that it: requires schools to ensure the achievement of all students is rising, provides parents with information they need about their childrens' achievement, and has resulted in better test scores. But near the end, he talked about the "growing consensus" to keep the law's hard line on accountability. There is a growing consensus across the country that now is not the time to water down standards or to ...


As part of NCLB's 7th anniversary celebration, Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings has released a long document entitled "Great Expectations." The 67-page document summarizes the Bush administration's message on NCLB for the past two years. Using a common device, it offers a word for the first five letters of the alphabet—two words actually for "C"—and explains why each word is important for the future. Here's a synopsis: Accountability: "The next president will face calls to dismantle or radically redefine accountability. He should resist them." Bipartisanship: "The No Child Left Behind Act was approved overwhelmingly because it united Republicans...


Thanks to my colleagues on our in-house research team, we know a lot more about the AYP status of schools and districts in the 2007-08 school year. Here are three pieces of data that stand out from the story I wrote and that appeared online before my holiday break: 1.) More than a third of schools failed to make AYP in the 2007-08 school year, up by 7 percentage points from the previous year. 2.) Eighteen percent of schools are in school improvement, meaning they've missed AYP for one or more years. That's a jump of just 2 percentage points. ...


Advertisement

Recent Comments

  • Cheryl Jones: David, What do you think will happen with NCLB? Cheryl read more
  • Michael Theriault: I understand your point about having a student's grades reflect read more
  • Al: Thank you sir for your courage. If only most teachers read more
  • Al: Thank you sir for your courage. If only most teachers read more
  • Al: Thank you sir for your courage. If only most teachers read more

Archives

Technorati

Technorati search

» Blogs that link here