The pilot projects for growth models and differentiated accountability have gotten a lot of notice since Margaret Spellings became secretary in 2005. But Spellings also has been granting waivers regarding public school choice and supplemental educational services. She has given several districts permission to reverse the timetable for implementing those changes, allowing them to offer the SES one year before choice. Last month, she said she'd consider applications from all states. Alabama is seeking a waiver to do that. A Birmingham school advocate and national civil rights organizations are teaming up in opposition.Citizens for Better Schools in Birmingham, with ...


Sen Barack Obama wasn't shy about taking on the National Education Association in his speech on Saturday. As in 2007, he endorsed performance pay to reward teachers who "consistently excel in the classroom." A few of the 10,000 NEA members booed, but most were silent, Vaishali Honawar reports in her blog on the convention. But Obama did give a nod to NEA's desire to increase federal K-12 funding. In the litany of things he would change about NCLB, increasing funding for the law was at the top. "Forcing out educators to accomplish all of [the law's goals] without the ...


Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings loves Reading First. She says educators do, too. Here's what she told Greg Toppo of USA Today: "If I had a nickel for every person who said, 'Thank God for Reading First,' I'd be a millionaire." Let's do the math on that. At 20 nickels to a dollar, that would mean 20 million people would be singing the program's praises for Spellings to become a millionaire. The program is 6 1/2 years old. That's 2,373 days. To get a million dollars, every day, 8,428 people would have told Spellings about Reading ...


MM has assigned me the task of making sense of the National Education Association's new "Great Public Schools for Every Student by 2020." I read two pieces of NEA's six-point plan, and I saw dollar signs jumping off the page. The NEA wants Congress to guarantee full funding for NCLB's Title I and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. (In federal budget terms, that would make those programs entitlements, meaning they wouldn't be subjected to the cap on discretionary spending.) That would more than double the $26 billion currently spent on those programs. The new federal money would be small ...


Why did only six states win approval to participate in the "differentiated accountability" pilot project? After all, Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings said she would let up to 10 states into the program. The answer comes in the Word document summarizing peer reviewers' perspectives on the proposals. The methods appeared largely to be based on methods of convenience rather than a focus on the underlying causes of schools inability to meet AYP. The boldface is in the original. That's like getting a D- on the paper you stayed up all night to write. Never a good day when that happens. ...


Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings today announced that six states won her approval to participate in the differentiated accountability pilot project. The lucky states are Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, and Ohio. Here's the department's press release. "The plans these states submitted speak to the fact that many were among the first to embrace data-based decision making and accountability," Spellings said, according to remarks prepared for her to give at the Education Commission of the States' conference in Austin, Texas. You can read all of the state applications at the Department of Education's Web site or Chad Aldeman's summary of ...


Reauthorize, don't re-regulate. That's the message state education officials sent the Department of Education in reaction to the rules Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings unveiled as her alternative to NCLB reauthorization two months ago. In their formal reaction to the rules proposal, the Council of Chief State School Officers and the National Association of State Boards of Education said that it's the wrong time to issue new rules that will give their members a long list of things to do. "This investment in time and money may be worthwhile were these regulations to be in place for more than a ...


If you think NCLB is harsh, take a look at new English policies. In its new "National Challenge," the Ministry of Education recently announced that it will shut down secondary schools that don't meet specific test-score targets. By 2011, the goal is for every school to have 30 percent of its student body passing tests in five subjects in the General Certificate of Secondary Education. That may sound like an easy goal. (After all, states' high school exit exams assess subject matter that is less rigorous than what's expected of high school graduates.) But it's not. If the rules went ...


Oklahoma City teacher John Thompson took over the Core Knowledge blog yesterday. Thompson, a serial commenter here and elsewhere, has this to say about NCLB: "Educational reformers often act like a team that is down by several touchdowns late in the game. We abandon any semblance of a game plan and throw one desperation pass after another, creating turnovers and making things worse. When our school addressed the challenge of NCLB by instituting high stakes benchmark testing, the argument was, 'We have tried everything else. Why not try this?' We learned the hard way. On the other hand, it ...


Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings wrote appropriators yesterday in a last-ditch effort to save Reading First. She cites the department's data on reading comprehension and urges legislators to talk with educators on the ground about the program. "You may find, as I have, that the program has helped raise expectations and prepare students, including English language learners and students with disabilities, for academic success," she wrote. The effort is "too little, too late," Mike Petrilli writes. In a new blog (via TWIE), reading expert Timothy Shanahan is already thinking about what can replace the program. This three-step process would be: ...


Advertisement

Recent Comments

  • Cheryl Jones: David, What do you think will happen with NCLB? Cheryl read more
  • Michael Theriault: I understand your point about having a student's grades reflect read more
  • Al: Thank you sir for your courage. If only most teachers read more
  • Al: Thank you sir for your courage. If only most teachers read more
  • Al: Thank you sir for your courage. If only most teachers read more

Archives

Technorati

Technorati search

» Blogs that link here