Commenting on my post from Friday, Monty Neil of FairTest notes that not all civil rights groups will oppose the bill to suspend sanctions under NCLB. He's right. I should have written that "some" civil rights groups are going to fight the bill. To see which ones, read Charlie Barone's post. At the FairTest site, you can see the civil rights groups that are likely to support H.R. 6239. At BoardBuzz, you can read why the National School Boards Association supports the bill. It would "make sure schools do not continue to be subject to mislabeling and costly sanctions ...


Back when President Bush and top Democrats were declaring NCLB reauthorization to be a top priority, who would have thought that the most important NCLB bill introduced in this Congress would be by a low-profile House member who doesn't sit on an education committee? Things may be shaping up that way. This week, Rep. Sam Graves, R-Mo., introduced H.R. 6239, the NCLB Recess Until Reauthorization Act. H.R. 6239 would suspend NCLB's accountability measures for one year or until Congress reauthorizes the law. In other words, in the 2007-08 school year, states wouldn't publish AYP results . Rep. Timothy J. ...


Governors say the Department of Education's proposal to require states to use the same method of calculating graduation rates isn't ready to be implemented. Read the National Governors Association's comments at the NGA Web site. The deadline for comments on the April 23 rules package is coming up. If you want to pass along comments on graduation rates or any other issue, e-mail them to me at [email protected]


Lisa Graham Keegan sat down with Michele McNeil and a bunch of reporters this morning to explain where Sen. John McCain of Arizona stands on education. Keegan, the top education adviser to the presumptive Republican nominee, had a lot to say about NCLB funding, school choice, and intervening in low-performing schools. Read all about it over at Campaign K-12....


Another day, another big statement from education leaders. Today's comes from a coalition called the Education Equality Project, which has been formed by New York City Chancellor Joel I. Klein and citizen activist Al Sharpton. Unlike "Broader, Bolder" approach released yesterday, the coalition's statement focuses exclusively on the education policies needed to improve educational achievement. It doesn't mention that social programs should assist schools, as the "Broader, Bolder" statement did. "We don't know yet what schools can achieve," Klein said at a news conference announcing the coalition's formation. "Some schools today are getting entirely different outcomes with the very same ...


Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings made news of her own today. She announced that Michigan and Missouri will be allowed to use growth models. Michigan can start now, but Missouri has to adopt the same 'n' for all subgroups before it can change over to growth. Spellings has approved 11 states in the growth model pilot—the secretary's first and biggest effort to provide flexibility under NCLB. States will have one last chance to win Spellings' approval in the growth-model pilot. She's calling for applications again in the fall and will approve the last ones before she hands over the ...


Three quick things before I run off and spend the day in downtown D.C. 1. The Center for American Progress holds a one-day conference today on the teacher comparability rules in NCLB's Title I. The center says that the rules are "intended to ensure that federal funds are added to an already-level playing field of state and local funding for schools," but they have "been ineffective and enforced inconsistently." For a primer about how districts sometimes unknowingly funnel Title I dollars to affluent areas, read a story Bess Keller wrote last year and one I wrote back in 2005. ...


Friday's face-off between education advisers left a lot of us wanting more. Jeanne Century of the Obama campaign and Lisa Graham Keegan of the McCain campaign gave an overview of their candidates' stands on NCLB and other education issues. But they didn't clear explanations on some nitty-gritty policy questions. At Campaign K-12, Alyson Klein complains about their lack of specificity, but highlights their differences on teacher performance pay, funding, and Reading First—all issues at the heart of NCLB's future. At USA Today's political blog, Greg Toppo says their proposed fixes for NCLB are ones "only education wonks can appreciate."...


Ed Week's self-appointed ombudsman Mike Petrilli alerts everyone that NEA is advertising its newest podcast/blog here and on other blogs on this site. (Hey, Mike, edweek.org wouldn't take advertising, either, if we had an endowment paying our salaries.) But anyway. Joel. I've like what the commenters are saying on your site. MM has some questions for you over at Campaign K-12. Here's one I'll add: How do you feel about John McCain's top education adviser, Lisa Graham Keegan, saying one test is enough to make accountability decisions? (Thanks to Jim Horn for the link.) Oh, wait, I just ...


Charlie Barone's reacts to the Center on Education Policy's report warning that some states will ask schools to make "rapid and steep jumps" in student achievement. (See Steep Climb to NCLB Goal for 23 States.) Barone's headline: "100% Bull$#!%" In the item, he explains that schools will be able to get around the achievement goals through a safe harbor. Under safe harbor, a school can make AYP by producing a 10 percentage point decrease in students who are not proficient in any subgroup or subject matter where the school fell short of its AYP goals in the previous year. "Safe ...


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