In her speech this morning, Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings made it clear she doesn't like the House committee's NCLB draft. In her prepared remarks and comments to reporters afterword, she focused her criticism on accountability and supplemental services. The proposal to add alternative measures to the accountability system would complicate it and could "water down" the focus on reading and mathematics, she said. According to her estimates, there would be a 75 percent reduction in the number of Utah schools identified as failing to make adequate yearly progress. And the section creating a two-tiered accountability system would make 250,000...


By noon tomorrow, we'll know more about the future of the House education committee's NCLB draft . By then, Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings will have delivered a speech entitled "No Child Left Behind: Moving Forward." I'm betting she'll outline her position on multiple measures, differentiated interventions, and other issues in the draft. After Spellings speaks, Rep. George Miller, D-Calif., and Rep. Howard P. "Buck" McKeon, R-Calif., are scheduled to give responses. I hope we'll get a sense of how committed they are to the details in their "work in progress." A special education advocate and a local superintendent will appear ...


Now that the Labor Day weekend is over, get ready to hear from education groups about where they stand on the House committee's NCLB draft. Next in line at this blog is the Education Industry Association. In a statement released last week, Executive Director Steven Pines says says that thousands of students would lose their eligibility for tutoring and other services under the draft. EIA doesn't like the two-tiered accountability system. Only students in high-priority schools would have access to tutoring. That would deny such help to students in priority schools (i.e. those schools that miss AYP in a ...


Here's my final post summarizing the contents of the House education committee's NCLB draft. (See Part 1 and Part 2.) I'll focus on students with disabilities and touch on a few other subjects ... Testing Special Education Children The draft would keep the Department of Education's 2 percent rule intact. That rule allows 2 percent of students (approximately 20 percent of special education students) to take a modified assessment. Those who are proficient on those modified tests are counted as proficient for accountability purposes. To accommodate districts with high numbers of special education students, the draft would allow districts to apply ...


Through the magic of the World Wide Web, you can read my story that will appear in the Sept. 5 issue of Education Week. Check back at edweek.org today for sidebars on English Language Learners and special education students. They should be up Friday afternoon. One of the subtexts to this story is that it occurred during the last week of August, a week that many Washingtonians reserve for vacation. Over the course of the week, I talked to one person who was at his house on the Chesapeake Bay and another at his second home in Colorado. I ...


Just finished my reporting for my story that will appear in the Sept. 5 issue of Education Week. It should be posted on edweek.org soon. I plan to blog a comment or two on it when it's posted. First here's my summary of the differentiated interventions of the House proposal. Under the current law, schools receive the same menu of interventions if they miss their AYP targets by a little or a lot, in one subgroup or all of them. This section is intended to tailor the intensity of the interventions to the needs of the school. But Michael ...


Many folks out there are looking through the fine print of the 400-page NCLB draft that the House education committee put out yesterday. If you don't have time to do that—or even read the summary—here's a digest of issues related to testing, accountability, and AYP. I'll follow up with issues related to special education and differentiated consequences. For a summary of issues related to English Language Learners, read this post on Learning the Language, a blog written by my colleague Mary Ann Zehr. One key point to remember about this proposal is that it retains two significant...


I'll be posting more on the House draft bill later, but I first I want to call your attention to the current issue of Education Week. As usual, it's full of NCLB news and commentary. The 39th Annual Phi Delta Kappa/Gallup poll on attitudes toward public schools is out today and it focuses primarily on NCLB. The headline Poll Finds Rise in Unfavorable Views of NCLB tells the story in a nutshell. Andrew Trotter's story lays out the details, documenting how public support for the law has declined gradually since 2003. NCLB critics say the public attitudes mirror their ...


Alyson Klein and I have seen a summary of the changes that House education leaders are proposing for Title I, Part A of NCLB. Both Rep. George Miller, D-Calif., and Howard P. "Buck" McKeon, R-Calif., signed onto the draft. You can read our reporting on the draft and you can look at legislative language at the House Education and Labor Committee's Web site. We'll be tracking this story with more updates to come....


Rep. George Miller and his staff have been working hard during August recess. The chairman of the House education committee told Florida educators yesterday that he would be releasing a draft of NCLB bill soon, probably today. I checked the committee's Web site this morning and haven't found anything. This post from an outspoken NCLB critic suggests that the draft is an attempt to garner support for the bill among educators, parents, and even students. Stayed tuned to edweek.org and to this blog for updates....


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