House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has been largely silent about the No Child Left Behind Act. But yesterday she told the National Conference of State Legislatures that Congress will make such signficant changes to the law that it will have to be renamed. NCSL has been sharply critical of much of the NCLB law, particularly its expansion of the federal role in education. But Ms. Pelosi seems to think they'll like the new version, according to this story on stateline.org. "I believe you will be pleased with the legislation that is gathering strong bipartisan support. The bill will be fair ...


Democratic presidential candidate Bill Richardson is working hard to win over educators in New Hampshire. According to the Associated Press, the governor of New Mexico pledged to a state conference of National Education Association members to completely scrap the No Child Left Behind Act and seek a federal minimum wage for teachers. It’ll be interesting to see whether any of the Democratic front-runners—Sen. Hillary Clinton of New York, Sen. Barack Obama of Illinois, or former Sen. John Edwards of North Carolina— will feel compelled to move towards those positions or flesh out their own education proposals. We might ...


Linda Perlstein’s new book Tested: One American School Struggles to Make the Grade has garnered a lot of attention, both online and in print. Ms. Perlstein spent the 2005-06 school year at Tyler Heights Elementary School in Annapolis, Md., chronicling the Title I school’s efforts to maintain its remarkable gains on state standardized tests. Unlike their more ad-vantaged peers at a neighboring elementary school, students at Tyler Heights have little time for creative activities, such as puppet shows and plays, according to Ms. Perlstein. Opponents of NCLB’s testing regime say the book fuels arguments that the federal ...


Congress is headed out of town, and so am I. I'll leave the blog in the capable hands of my colleague, Alyson Klein. Alyson and I work together reporting stories (see here and here) for the Washington section for Education Week. Although August is traditionally a slow news month in Washington, I'm sure Alyson won't lack for NCLB news. States are starting to release their AYP results, schools are getting ready for to start the 2007-08 year, and tutoring providers soon will start recruiting students. There's never a break from NCLB news. I'll return on Aug. 20, and I look ...


This academic study will give ammunition to both sides of the NCLB debate. In it, researchers S. David Brazer and Erin E. Peters of George Mason University tracked policy changes in an anonymous California district. About half of the districts' 13,000 students speak English as a second language, and its schools are struggling to make AYP with that population. The district's management team decided to require to elementary schools of offer limited English proficient students English literacy instruction 30 minutes a day, four days a week. The instruction was to be done during the 2 1/2 hours a ...


You may have to wait till September to glimpse the future of NCLB, but you'll be able to spend your August vacation imagining the future of math and science education. Sean Cavanagh reports for Education Week that the House passed a so-called competitiveness bill yesterday. The comprehensive legislation is chock full of math and science education. It has a new math program to get students ready to take algebra and scholarships for undergraduates who promise to teach math and science in high-need schools. Read more here. The Senate is expected to vote on the bill today and send it to ...


In this video from the Educator Roundtable, you'll hear (over and over) the most common criticism of NCLB: It requires too much testing. What strikes me is the repeated images of President Bush. As Eduwonk notes, polling shows that respondents support the general concepts of NCLB. But that support fades once they're asked a question that identifies those concepts with NCLB. Because the name is so closely associated with the president, maybe his unpopularity (as shown in polls here and here) will hinder reauthorization....


Even as Congress prepares for vacation, House members are stating their priorities for NCLB reauthorization. Today, the Alliance for Excellent Education put out an alert about the Measuring and Evaluating Trends for Reliability, Integrity, and Continued Success Act, or the METRICS Act. It would provide up to $150 million in formula grants for states to create and use new longitudinal data systems. Such systems are vital for developing accurate graduation rates and for helping educators understand how to help students improve their academic performance, data lovers say. Reps. Rush Holt, D-N.J., and Carolyn McCarthy, D-N.Y., are sponsoring the ...


A bunch of the reporting and reaction to Rep. George Miller's NCLB speech focused on his statement about graduation rates, making a big deal that this measure would be an addition to the law's accountability system. But graduation rates currently are an ingredient in determining adequate yearly progress in high schools. The problem is that states have set their goals so low that the graduation rates almost don't matter, the Education Trust says in a report out today. In its analysis, the Ed Trust found that states' goals are "far too low" to have any impact. It also suggests that ...


The reactions to Rep. George Miller's speech on the future of NCLB reauthorization are in. In the Education Week story, Mark Walsh notes that Rep. Howard P. "Buck" McKeon is disappointed by the pace of negotiations. The congressman's statement also says that he won't support a bill that weakens the current law's "three pillars:" accountability, flexibility, and parental choice. The story also has an interview with the NEA's Joel Packer, showing that the union dislikes performance pay for teachers. Education Secretary Margaret Spellings suggests that she's willing to be patient and wait for a bill that doesn't "roll back" accountability ...


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