When people criticize NCLB for being unfair to schools, they point their fingers at President Bush and Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings. But, as my retrospective look at the Bush presidency points out, Rep. George Miller, D-Calif., had a significant role in making NCLB's accountability rules as tough as they are. Bush's initial NCLB proposal would have required schools to set up schools to make AYP goals for all students and specifically for low-income students. They also would have needed to report the progress of students in minority groups and categories such as special education students and English-language learners. But ...


Education Sector's Tom Toch gives the rundown on Linda Darling-Hammond's latest thoughts about the role of assessments in school reform efforts. He deconstructs the Stanford University professor's article in Phi Delta Kappan examining other countries' performance-based tests, and he wonders how Darling-Hammond might use these ideas if she retains influence over the Obama administration's policies. (Only the abstract is free online.) Toch concludes: So, if Barack Obama gives Linda Darling-Hammond a major role in his administration, we're going to have a big policy debate over testing in American education and whether we should move beyond NCLB accountability to something potentially ...


Two weeks ago, I reviewed where two of President-elect Barack Obama's K-12 advisers stood on assessment issues related to NCLB. Jon Schnur supports the idea of creating a national test that is developed by states or private organizations. Linda Darling-Hammond suggests there should be multiple measures that determine whether a school is successful. Then, I promised to give you an update on what the next president thinks on testing. I've looked through everything I can find. But I don't have a clear idea of where the president-elect stands on the issue. Then again, I'm not the only one in that ...


In my quest to find out where the players in the next presidential administration stand on NCLB, I watched a Sept. 24 debate at the Fordham Institute. (See embedded video below.) In it, Jon Schnur, a key adviser to President-elect Obama, teamed with former Colorado Gov. Roy Romer to argue for a stronger federal role in education policy. In general, Schnur said he believes the federal government should play a role in setting "national standards and assessments, not set by the federal government, but supported by the federal government. We have a real problem right now with bad assessments that ...


Yesterday, I wondered how major players in NCLB's future would answer the following question: "What will the next version of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act look like?" Today, I give you two links that outline the ideas of Linda Darling-Hammond—the Stanford University professor whom President-elect Barack Obama has tapped to lead the review of federal education policy. Darling-Hammond also has been mentioned as a potential education secretary and appears to be the choice one member of a NEA affiliate's staff*, according to Chad Aldeman. So, what does Darling-Hammond think about NCLB? Although she's been circumspect in recent public...


Over at New Talk, the usual suspects are discussing the question: Should we scrap No Child Left Behind? Although the debate is interesting, you won't be surprised by the answers. Neal McCluskey of the Cato Institute and Richard Rothstein of the Economic Policy Institute say yes. Former Bush adviser Sandy Kress, eduwonk Andy Rotherham, Stanford's Eric Hanushek, and several others say no. All of them want changes, but they would keep much of its core principles intact. Isn't NewTalk asking the wrong question of the wrong people? The real question is: What will the next version of the Elementary and ...


David Brooks of The New York Times is dreaming of an Obama administration that defies traditional Democratic policies. He'd like to see "liberal Republicans" like Diane Ravitch, McCain economic adviser Douglas Holtz-Eakin, and former Missouri Sen. Jim Talent working for the new president. These people will be take stances that are neither conservative nor liberal. Among other things, "they’ll insist on merit pay and preserving No Child Left Behind’s accountability standards, no matter what the teachers’ unions say." Like a lot of dreams, this one doesn't make sense. Diane Ravitch is about as anti-NCLB as commenter John Thompson (see...


Lots of people want answers to specific questions about the future of NCLB during today's chat on what Tuesday's election will mean for NCLB and other education issues. I explained that the president-elect's stances on the law are vague. I could predict some things: the accountability system will morph into some sort of growth model, and that the next version of the law still will track students by various subgroups. But I have no sense of exactly what those changes will look like. I don't think anybody does. As I responded to questions, I was listening to the Gadfly Show, ...


One blogger's reaction to this week's NCLB rules is the latest sign that Democrats are divided over the future of federal education policy. Robert Blomeyer has begun a campaign against the regulations. On my.barackobama.com, he writes: This is an obvious continuation of the same old "top down" essentialist education agenda that the Bush administration has pushed over almost eight years. Going any further with these "rule changes," which are nothing more than an "interpretation" of what this Secretary and her politically appointed staff interpret the legislation to mean, is a waste of time and $$ that the education community ...


In announcing new NCLB rules yesterday, Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings said they “will help us build on the progress of No Child Left Behind and set the table until Congress can act on this legislation.” Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, D-Mass., more or less agreed with her. The rules are a “significant step forward in helping schools, parents, and teachers bring new solutions to the challenges of helping every child get ahead in school,” the chairman of the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee, said in a statement. “The new regulations will allow schools to innovate while Congress works ...


Advertisement

Recent Comments

  • Cheryl Jones: David, What do you think will happen with NCLB? Cheryl read more
  • Michael Theriault: I understand your point about having a student's grades reflect read more
  • Al: Thank you sir for your courage. If only most teachers read more
  • Al: Thank you sir for your courage. If only most teachers read more
  • Al: Thank you sir for your courage. If only most teachers read more

Archives

Technorati

Technorati search

» Blogs that link here