This clip from Education Week's webinar: "Trends for the 21st Century: Preparing for the Schools of Tomorrow", includes noted futurist Gary Marx discussing the implications of these trends on education and schools.


Growth mindsets are being instilled across the country to give every student the opportunity to reach his or her full potential. Learn about how the growth mindset is working for teachers and students in our new e-book.


In this clip from an Education Week's webinar: "Trends for the 21st Century: Preparing for the Schools of Tomorrow", noted futurist Gary Marx emphasizes the importance of staying in touch with trends and issues in education.


In an Education Week webinar entitled "Trends for the 21st Century: Preparing for the Schools of Tomorrow", noted futurist Gary Marx discusses a wide range of topics and offers a deeper understanding of impending challenges and opportunities to prepare educators for the schools of tomorrow. In this clip, listen to Marx discuss how to release ingenuity in the classroom.


Check out our back-to-school titles from Education Week Press as you prepare for the new school year. Topics include classroom management, tips for new teachers, helping struggling learners, and more.


The 25th anniversary of charter schools marks a period of considerable challenges and successes for the movement. Our free e-book PDF details the impact of the charter school movement on public education, school choice initiatives, student achievement, and more over its first 25 years.


The Every Student Succeeds Act is set to reshape our education system. Find out what the new federal k-12 law means for schools and the communities they serve in our new e-book.


Teaching students ethics is as important as teaching them skills and knowledge. Here are four key markers for teaching ethics, along with suggested discussion starters.


As the pace of technological change continues to accelerate, educators may have difficulty keeping up. Read predictions and educational implications of new technologies.


When we neglect impoverished children, we all pay for it. Morally and economically, that cost is greater than the up-front investment.


The opinions expressed in Author's Corner by Education Week Press are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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