Empowerment groups can help at-risk boys improve their self-image, behavior, and future outlooks, says a study in the latest Afterschool Matters journal, published by the National Institute on Out-of-School Timeat Wellesley College. The article, "Growing Boys: Implementing a Boys' Empowerment Group in Afterschool Programs," draws its findings about boys' empowerment groups for at-risk males from a case study of an after-school group for middle school boys in the Northeast. Researchers found that weekly meetings with a positive adult role model improved the participants' attitudes, helped them manage anger, and led to more positive social interactions and general behavior. The study ...


After-school networks in nine states will be hosting mayoral summits in the next year on how to build and improve cities' out-of-school time and after-school systems, the National League of Cities announced today. The summits will be facilitated through the Youth, Education and Families (YEF) institute at the National League of Cities, a Washington-based nonprofit that helps cities strengthen leadership and overall quality of life. The Charles Stewart Mott Foundation and The Wallace Foundation will be providing financial support to the nine cities; each will receive $6,600 to host the events, as well as programming support from the NLC. ...


New York-based nonprofit TASC (The After-School Corporation), has released its 2010 annual report along with a video that follows two 4th graders through a day at their expanded-learning-time school, Thurgood Marshall Academy in Harlem, to show how an ELT school differs from the traditional 6.5-hour-day model. Along with other efforts in the out-of-school-time and extended-learning realm (profiled in an earlier blog post), TASC helps 17 expanded-learning-time schools in New York implement best-practice ELT models that add roughly 430 more hours (35 percent) than the standard American school day, totalling 1,600 hours a year. The TASC-supported ELT schools make ...


Two Boston area middle schools that receive state money to expand the school day may lose their funding if they fail to meet state accountability standards for the second year in a row. As I mentioned in another blog item, the Massachusetts state department of education and the nonprofit Massachusetts 2020 launched an initiative in 2005 to fund schools that wanted to add at least 300 hours to the year for additional academic, enrichment, and teacher-development time at underperforming schools. Today, the funding—$17.5 million two years ago and $13.9 million this year—supports 19 schools throughout...


As summer rapidly approaches, more sources report that youth-employment programs aren't the only ones facing cuts this summer. (See what I wrote a few weeks ago about pending cuts to summer employment programs for teens.) As a result of the District of Columbia's budget deficit, the city is cutting roughly $17 million from summer school, youth-employment programs and enrichment camps, leaving 15,000 students without "structured programs" to attend, WAMU radio reported this week. The District's summer school program was reduced from $9 million to $4 million, lowering enrollment by 75 percent, and the city's summer employment program cut from ...


While U.S. Rep. David Cicilline (D-R.I.), now focuses on federal concerns on Capitol Hill, his mayoral work developing after-school programs in Providence, R.I., have been lauded by, and influential on, the out-of-school-time community for the past decade-plus. Cicilline, a Rhode Island native, was elected the mayor of Providence in 2002 with the promise of turning around the city's downtrodden neighborhoods, reducing the crime rate, and, importantly, reforming the city's education system with a focus on building high-quality after-school programs. He launched the Providence After School Alliance in 2004, which, through public and private support, developed a citywide ...


Out-of-school-time programs and school day programs operate in separate silos, with OST programs pushed to "prove [their] worthiness" to "have a seat at the education table," wrote Helen Janc Malone yesterday in the "Futures of School Reform" blog on our Education Week site. "This shows a misunderstanding of what these programs are designed to do, a narrow definition of what constitutes learning, and an over-eagerness to measure every form of knowledge acquisition against the same yardstick," she writes. Malone's post, "Prove It!" is from the blog associated with a seven-part Commentary series organized by the Harvard Graduate School of Education ...


Jennifer Davis, president of the National Center on Time and Learning, talks about lessons learned from schools using expanded learning time models, suggestions for districts who are interested in ELT, and notable efforts underway around the country to redesign schools' use of time.


Participants emphasized that strengthening accountability, improving data tracking, and building community partnerships and sustainability were fundamental to developing expanded learning time programs, but that there wasn't a definitive answer for how to add time to deliver better education.


A few weeks ago, the bipartisan Time for Innovation Matters in Education Act was proposed in both houses of Congress, which, if passed, will establish a competitive grant program for states that want to add at least 300 hours to the school year in their underperforming schools. Under the act, states can apply for grants that they will distribute to schools, districts, and community organizations for "expanded learning time" initiatives used to redesign their school calendars with additional hours. State education agencies and local districts will decide how schools will add the time, but in general, the hours are to ...


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