Strengthening the Teaching Profession

Jack Schneider and former Massachusetts Secretary of Education Paul Reville discuss the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), looking at how Congress might approach ESEA reauthorization in a manner that strengthens the teaching profession.


What's Worth Keeping in NCLB?

Jack Schneider and Paul Reville discuss the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, paying particular attention to how it might be improved from its current incarnation as "No Child Left Behind."


The Limits of Testing and the Future of Accountability

Should policymakers have anticipated the problematic consequences of high-stakes testing? Jack Schneider and Paul Reville discuss.


Why Has the Dominance of Standardized Tests Persisted?

In this post, Jack Schneider and Paul Reville discuss the increasingly central role that standardized tests have played in public education for the past two decades.


Introducing Paul Reville

Following Michelle Rhee, Julian Vasquez-Heilig, and Andy Smarick, the latest guest on the blog is Paul Reville.


Do Reformers Need Reforming?

Jack Schneider and Andy Smarick discuss whether policy elites are improving, or harming the educational system.


Do Policymakers Cherry-Pick Research?

It seems that for every complex issue, there is competing research to cite. Jack Schneider and Andy Smarick discuss.


When Should the Courts Intervene?

Jack Schneider and Andy Smarick discuss the pursuit of educational policy changes through the courts.


Does Money Matter? Is School Funding Fair?

In this post, Jack Schneider makes the case that funding matters and that current efforts are inadequate. Andy Smarick, on the other hand, thinks funding can't be an excuse for low performance.


Fixing NCLB

Lots of very tricky issues will need to be worked out if No Child Left Behind is going to be fixed and reauthorized. Jack Schneider and Andy Smarick discuss.


The opinions expressed in K-12 Schools: Beyond the Rhetoric are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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