The U.S. secretary of education urged attendees at the Conservative Political Action Conference to help fight those she said have stymied access to school choice and quality schools.


Although there was intense opposition from Democrats and activists to the education secretary's nomination, some wonder whether that detracted from opposition to nominees like Attorney General Jeff Sessions.


Without any regulations for a requirement that federal spending supplement state and local aid to schools, districts could be entering a new area of flexibility under the Every Student Succeeds Act.


President Donald Trump—who didn't talk much about K-12 education on the campaign trail—picked an education secretary in Betsy DeVos with whom he doesn't have close, long-standing ties.


Educators at Washington, D.C.'s Jefferson Middle School Academy did not take kindly the education secretary's comment after a school visit that "they're waiting to be told what to do."


The American Federation of Teachers and the National Education Association were major opponents of the new education secretary during her confirmation process, saying she would hurt public schools.


Amid the turnover accompanying the 115th Congress, you might have missed changes to staff investigative authority that affect the education committee in the House of Representatives.


In her third interview on conservative talk radio, the U.S. Secretary of Education also said ESSA "essentially does away with the notion of the common core."


The U.S. Secretary of Education's remarks in Washington came at her first public speech, where she celebrated magnet schools without committing to seeking additional funds for them.


Some Republicans say the education secretary's preliminary team is heavy on political hands and light on policy heft. Some would-be hires worry about working for a divisive secretary.


Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Most Viewed on Education Week

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments