November 2010 Archives

Schools and states found it hard to combine satisfy the ARRA's goals of both education redesign and economic development, Bellwether Education Partners finds.

The lame-duck Congress is still grappling with what kind of spending plan to hammer out for fiscal year 2011.

Officials say they want to take "lessons learned" from i3 and Race to the Top and apply them for a review of all of the agency's competitive grant program, including the Teacher Incentive Fund and School Improvement grants.

Some high priority education programs are still awaiting congressional action in the lame-duck session.

The dismal economic climate may well represent "new normal" for schools, Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said today at a forum sponsored by the American Enterprise Institute, a free market think tank. That means schools are going to have to make hard choices, Duncan said. And he's hoping they'll use the opportunity fundamentally rethink long-held ideas, such as the need for students to have a certain amount of "seat time" in each particular class, class size, and teacher pay scales that reward educators for getting advanced degrees. Duncan is hoping that school administrators won't cut areas that directly impact the ...

NEA wants regulatory relief from some of NCLB's requirements. The union sent a letter to U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan asking for flexibility in key areas.

Melody Barnes, who leads President Barack Obama's Domestic Policy Council, told an audience at an Education Week event today that reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act is going to be a "top" priority in the new year.

A survey asks inside-the-Beltway folks and state edu-bigwigs what they think about the political landscape for education in the wake of the midterm elections.

Rumor has it that Thelma Melendez de Santa Ana, the assistant secretary for elementary and secondary education, could be leaving the department to serve as superintendent of the Los Angeles Unified School District.

Some are wondering whether Congress will try to move a more limited bill that fixes some of the issues with the current law.

Lawmakers will be waddling back to D.C. next week for a lame duck session. They still have to finish the fiscal 2011 appropriations bill that funds the Department of Education. So the big question for a lot of folks in the eduworld is ... what happens to Race to the Top? The administration asked for $1.35 billion to continue the program for an additional year, and Congress is poised to provide some of that (there's $800 million in the House version of the bill, and $675 million in the Senate). Money is tight, but a lot of folks argue ...

Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash, has supported money to stave off teacher layoffs and introduced a comprehensive literacy bill.

The teachers' union is taking a wait-and-see attitude about the fallout from the midterm elections for the ESEA and other issues.

Colorado Sen. Michael Bennet, the former Denver schools superintendent, had strong backing from the National Education Association.

K-12 policy is one area where Republicans and Democrats could see eye-to-eye, President Barack Obama said today.

Rep. John Kline, R-Minn., released a statement today saying he's officially going to pursue the chairmanship of House Education and Labor Committee.

Sen. Majority Leader Harry Reid prevailed against Sharron Angle, a tea-party backed candidate who ran on scrapping the U.S. Department of Education.

The Wisconsin Democrat, who lost to GOP opponent Ron Johnson, was among a handful of lawmakers to vote against the No Child Left Behind Act in 2001.

Rep. Carol Shea-Porter, D-N.H., a member of the House Education and Labor Committee, has criticized the No Child Left Behind Act.

Richard Blumenthal, the Democratic attorney general, sued the federal government over the No Child Left Behind Act.

Chris Coons, a Democrat, and Marco Rubio, a Republican, both won in races that featured sharply differing views on aspects of education policy.

The Republican candidate for the state's open U.S. Senate seat is on record as saying he'd favor getting rid of the U.S. Department of Education.

All you education watchers who can't wait until Wednesday for the latest election results and analysis, stick with for election coverage through the night.

Want to hear Greg Darnieder, the U.S. Department of Education's senior advisor to the secretary on college access, deliver the keynote address at a conference for Philadelphia's middle and senior high school counselors? If so, you'll need to fire up the DeLorean. According to the department's Web site, the event is taking place on Dec. 31, 1969. (Thanks to a very alert Politics K-12 reader for pointing this out!) Happy almost Election Day!...

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