January 2011 Archives

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., aka Mr. Let's-Ditch-the-Department-of-Education, got a seat on the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee. Paul is also a member of the Senate's new tea party caucus. Paul's appointment, obviously, isn't curtains for 400 Maryland Ave. But Paul is going to be a tough customer who probably won't rush to sign off on the administration's ideas for ESEA renewal. The committee still has a number of GOP moderates though, including new member Sen. Mark Kirk of Illinois. Here's the full list of folks on the Senate Education Committee: Democrats: Sens. Tom Harkin of Iowa (who is ...

George Will on Arne Duncan: He's the Obama administration's redeeming feature.

A day after the State of the Union speech, the education secretary and members of the Senate's "Big 8" on education policy say they want to move swiftly to make changes to the nine-year-old law.

Nearly all the folks I spoke to after the State of the Union (including ESEA VIP Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn.) were on message that the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act can be a chance for both parties to come together. And there were other signs that lawmakers want to send a message that education is something they can all work together on. Moments after the speech, Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, the chairman of the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee, introduced a joint statement with Sen. Mike Enzi, the top Republican on the panel, saying basically, ...

The president calls on Congress to renew the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, tying his education proposals directly to the nation's economic future.

The guests in First Lady Michelle Obama's box will reinforce the themes of education and innovation.

President Obama is expected to talk a lot about K-12 policy in his State of the Union speech. Here's a look at what to watch for.

A second, smaller Race to the Top competition will attract far less interest from states.

Congressional Republicans are proposing to take back unused stimulus funds to pay for cuts to the federal budget.

Iowa is burning through its stimulus money the fastest, while Alaska, Wyoming and Texas have the most remaining.

Arne Duncan says common standards could produce technological innovations in schools. Top White House economic adviser Gene Sperling says the administration will seek to protect education, research, and development.

Sen. Bingaman will be the No. 2 Democrat in the Senate on ESEA reauthorization.

Secretary of Education Arne Duncan is clearly not kidding around about wanting to get a bipartisan reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act done this year. In fact, he's so committed, he's willing to brave Minnesota in the middle of January. Duncan is slated to appear with Rep. John Kline, R-Minn., the newly-minted chairman of the House Education and the Workforce Committee, at Crystal Lake Elementary School in Lakeville, Minn., next Friday. This marks the first time he's traveled to Kline's district. The high temperature is supposed to climb to 10 degrees. So I hope Duncan's packing some of ...

Just in case there is a future for the Investing in Innovation, or 'i3', competition, the U.S. Department of Education is gearing up. They've published proposed regulations that seek to tweak the rules that governed the 2010 competition. Comments are due by Feb. 9. Among the changes: the department wants to give itself more flexibility in determining what priorities i3 grant applicants must focus on when they make their pitches, and what selection criteria will be used to judge the applicants. In addition, the current regulations specify that a grant recipient can only win two awards and no more ...

Rumor has it that the president is going to make a big push for renewing the Elementary and Secondary Education Act in his address to the newly divided Congress, slated for Jan. 25.

Ed Week is hosting an online chat today (Wednesday) on the financial crisis facing schools. Two experts on state and local budgets will be answering readers' questions.

It's just one of the interesting facts you'll find if you dig deep into the treasure trove of data embedded in EdWeek's latest Quality Counts report.

Although the Minnesota governor wants to reapply for Race to the Top, there's nothing to reapply for yet.

Jon Schnur will aid Mayor Bloomberg on K-12 philanthropy and start a new nonprofit group.

Five one-time congressional aides, all with over a decade of experience in Washington, have teamed up to form Penn Hill Group, a new government relations firm that will specialize in a range of issues, including K-12 policy.

Invitations went out today to about 2,000 school districts that got federal funding in the past year under some of the department's signature competitive grant programs.

The Secretary of Education says K-12 policy can be a rare area of bipartisan agreement in a divided Washington.

Follow This Blog


Most Viewed on Education Week



Recent Comments