February 2011 Archives

Bill Gates to Govs: Raise Class Size, Avoid Furloughs

One of education's biggest philanthropists has a message for governors, which he's delivering right about now at the National Governors Association winter meeting in Washington. Do raise class size, Bill Gates is expected to tell the governors. Continue to research effective technologies that will reach more students. Don't impose furloughs or temporarily eliminate school days to save money. And don't keep paying teachers based on longevity and advanced degrees. We'll have more on Gates' speech at edweek.org later, but until then, he offered a preview in this Washington Post opinion piece. [UPDATE (March 1): Read about Gates' speech, and ...


Deadline Extended: Race to Top Commencement Challenge

Schools have until March 11 to apply for the Race to the Top Commencement Challenge. The reward? A graduation speech delivered by President Obama.


House Floats Plan to Keep Government Running, Scrap K-12 Programs

The latest proposal would keep things afloat for two weeks and give lawmakers a chance to continue negotiations on a bill to finance the government for the rest of fiscal year 2011.


What Would a Government Shutdown Do to Education?

While a shutdown probably would not be a picnic for anyone, if the past is any guide, most school districts and states wouldn't feel an immediate pinch.


Schools Drill Down Into Use of School Improvement Grants

The transformation model, often viewed as the least restrictive turnaround model under the federal program, again proves most popular, surveys by the Center on Education Policy show.


Ed. Dept.'s Melendez Entertains Job Offer

The assistant secretary for elementary and secondary education has been approached about several outside positions, the Education Department confirms.


Advocates Push Back Against Proposed Education Cuts

Pressure mounts on the U.S. Senate to reject current-year cuts to programs such as Head Start, Title I, and School Improvement Grants approved by the House of Representatives in the bill passed last weekend.


Chat Today, 2 P.M.: Two Years After the Stimulus

Join me and the Hechinger Institute's Richard Lee Colvin at 2 p.m. today as we discuss the effects of the economic-stimulus package, as detailed in a special project that involved education reporters from across the nation. We'll take your questions, so please, submit yours now....


U.S. House Votes to Slash Current-Year Education Funding

The U.S. Department of Education would see its budget slashed by more than $5 billion under the temporary spending bill approved early this morning, which now faces a showdown in the Senate as a March 4 final passage deadline looms.


Ed. Dept. Creates Commission on School Finance Equity

The commission will recommend ways that federal policy could address funding disparities.


House Lawmakers Vote to Spare IDEA; Cut SIG, Teacher Money

Good news and bad news for fans of education spending. The good news: The U.S. House of Representatives just voted to restore the $557.7 million cut to special education state grants in the fiscal year 2011 spending bill now under consideration on the House floor (you know, the one that will finance the government through Sept. 30 and cuts nearly $5 billion in education funding). The grants would stay funded at their current level of $11.5 billion. The money was put back through an amendment, offered by Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, R-Wash. Her three-year-old son, Cole, has ...


Stimulus Competitive Grants: State Winners and Losers

Ten states didn't win a dime from the competitions, an EdWeek analysis of U.S. Department of Education data shows.


Stimulus Reforms May 'Hit a Wall', CEP Report Says

Continued fiscal pressure are likely to pose a big hurdle for states looking to sustain momentum on education reform sparked by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, a survey finds.


ESEA's Big 8 Head to White House to Meet With Obama

The Big 8 lawmakers on education are headed to the White House on Thursday to meet with the president and discuss ESEA.


Obama Issues Budget Veto Threat

President Barack Obama just issued a veto threat on the House Spending Plan which would cut education by nearly $5 billion.


Obama Budget Reflects ESEA Policy Priorities

Republicans are not in a spendy mood, so many of the increases in the Obama administration's fiscal year 2012 budget proposal may well be Dead On Arrival on Capitol Hill. But the budget is more than just a spending plan, it's a policy document. And some of these proposals (especially the ones that don't cost a dime) may yet make it into law, namely, into the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Act. The most interesting proposed changes are in Race to the Top, part of the economic stimulus that would be extended under the proposal. If the administration actually ...


Obama Proposes Modest Hike in Education Spending for FY 2012

The Obama administration just released its spending proposal for fiscal year 2012, which begins Oct. 1. And once again, education is a bright spot in an otherwise tight budget year.


House GOP Looks to Slash Education Spending

The Republican budget plan would cut U.S. Department of Education funding to $4.9 billion below the fiscal 2010 level of $63.7 billion, including cuts to special education and Pell Grants.


Duncan Offers a Sneak Peek at Obama's 2012 Budget

Look for education as a bright spot in an austere budget, and a sequel with a twist we could call Race to the Top: The Locals Strike Back


House on K-12: No Money, Some Bipartisanship, Lots to Learn

Three things were obvious after the new GOPed-up House education committee held its first hearing on education.


Big, Big Money Problem: Finding Funds for Pell Grants

A huge shortfall in the program to help low-income students attend college could cause aftershocks for other domestic programs, including education.


Local School Board Members Play Hardball With Duncan

For U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, local school board members can be a really tough crowd. Last year, the National School Boards Association members gave Duncan grief after he tangled with them over his support of mayoral control. Not dissuaded, Duncan came back today to address the same crowd, whose members have come to grips with the new federal education reality. And many of them don't really like it. (They didn't really like their reality under former EdSec Margaret Spellings either.) In his speech, Duncan had nothing really new to say, choosing instead to reiterate past accomplishments (think ...


Sens. Bennet and Murray Join Team ESEA in the Senate

The two lawmakers, well known for their K-12 expertise, will take newly prominent roles in the negotiations.


Wurtzel Leaving Education Department

Judy Wurtzel, the deputy assistant secretary for planning, evaluation and policy development, is leaving the U.S. Department of Education to focus on "family and work part-time," she wrote in an email to colleagues yesterday. Today is her last day at the department, where she worked under Assistant Secretary Carmel Martin and helped shape the department's school improvement strategy. "The past two years have been extraordinary for the Department and for education reform across the country. I am grateful to have had the opportunity to contribute to this effort," wrote Wurtzel, who served as the executive director of the Aspen ...


Stimulus Misuse: 514 Complaints to Inspector General

Two years ago this month Congress passed the economic stimulus package, infusing the nation's schools with an additional $100 billion and providing an endless source of intrigue for us @ Politics K-12. While it may seem like a lot of the stimulus fun is over—you know, Race to the Top awards have been handed out, people are coming to grips with the four turnaround models—I think the fun (if you can call it that) is just beginning. And that's because we need to start asking: Where did all of that money go? In my quest to start answering...


Chiefs to Feds: Renew ESEA Soon or Help Us Innovate

If Congress doesn't move on reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act this year, states are poised to get going on their own ideas on accountability and other areas.


House to Hold First ESEA Hearing Next Week

Congress Geeks, clear your calendars! Next Thursday, the House Education and the Workforce Committee is planning to hold the very first hearing on the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act since the House of Representatives flipped to GOP control and Rep. John Kline, R-Minn., became the committee chairman. The title of the hearing is pretty expansive. It's called Education in the Nation: Examining the Challenges and Opportunities Facing America's Classrooms. The hearing will give members a broad overview of the issues facing K-12 schools, including the federal role in education policy, a spokesman for the panel told me. ...


Reps. Kline and Miller Talk ESEA

The new Republican chairman of the House Education and the Workforce Committee and the committee's top Democrat agree on a few basics when it comes to reauthorizing ESEA.


Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Most Viewed on Education Week

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments