July 2011 Archives

The organizers of the weekend's Save Our Schools March say reaction to their movement has only bolstered their resolve, and their work will continue.


U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan launches a renewed effort to remake the teaching profession, calling for higher salaries, improved performance-based teacher accountability, and a higher bar for those entering schools of education.


Speakers and workshops turned up the rhetorical heat on standards- and test-based accountability and other policies opposed by those attending the four-day gathering that includes a march on the White House on Saturday.


The organizers of the Save our Schools March and National Call to Action say the White House can come to them, or they'll come to the White House on Sunday. But they won't attend a meeting with President Obama's education advisers on Friday.


Education advocates are desperately scrambling to ensure that lawmakers look out for K-12 interests in a final agreement on the debt ceiling.


When the organizers of the wanted to quickly convey their concerns with the direction of education reform, they presented Education Secretary Arne Duncan with an art installation: a baby doll in a box. Not just any box, either, but a box wrapped in testing bubble answer sheets.


A four-day gathering in Washington, D.C., of those who say they're fed up with test-driven accountability includes march near the White House on Saturday.


Pell Grants were the elephant in the room when U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan testified Wednesday before the Senate panel that oversees K-12 spending.


The Senate education chairman declined today to be specific about exactly when the panel would get around to marking up the very, very long-overdue ESEA reauthorization bill.


A new undertaking from the federal Justice and Education departments targets school discipline policies that divert students from schools to the justice system and keep them from pursuing an education.


Supporter of Pell Grants worry the program could suffer if debt-reduction talks in Congress end up imposing big new cuts on the U.S. Department of Education.


Last year, when the Investing in Innovation pot was bigger, 1,600 applicants competed for $650 million. This year, with $150 million up for grabs, nearly 1,400 are likely to apply.


Tough spending choices could be in store for states and districts on K-12 education if Congress and President Obama fail to reach a deal on raising the debt ceiling--and even if they do.


States that have signaled they will not apply for the $500 million Race to the Top early-learning competition include Florida, California, and Tennessee.


The U.S. Department of Education could withhold federal funds and require better testing security in the fallout of numerous cheating scandals.


Thelma Melendez, the assistant secretary for elementary and secondary education at the U.S. Department of Education, is leaving to take the helm of the Santa Ana school district in Orange County, Calif.


The president met with several CEOs this afternoon to ask the business community to commit more money to improving K-12 education.


The Education Department seems ready to waive the 2014 deadline for all students to be proficient in math and language arts in exchange for states adopting college- and career-readiness standards and tests.


Republicans say the measure would make it easier for districts and states to direct federal dollars where they are most needed.But Democrats say the proposed leeway would allow districts and states to ignore the students most at risk - poor and minority kids.


More states are pushing back deadlines and scaling back or even eliminating projects they promised to do as part of winning the $4 billion federal Race to the Top competition.


New legislation in Congress would overhaul the Title I funding formula, which rural advocates say favors larger, urban areas over poor, rural districts and small cities.


The U.S. Department of Education has given Montana an Aug. 15 deadline to report how the state plans to comply with the No Child Left Behind Act.


States and districts would get unprecedented leeway to move around federal money under the latest in a series of bill reauthorizing the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.


A bill offering superintendents flexibility in spending federal dollars is likely to stir partisan battle.


Duncan doesn't offer the House education chairman any details on his proposal to give states leeway on some of the requirements of No Child Left Behind in exchange for adopting reforms.


Up to six communities will get the chance to create a version of the Harlem Children's Zone in their own backyards, now that the U.S. Department of Education has opened up the very first round of Promise Neighborhood implementation grants.


U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said he would take enforcement action against Montana for defying parts of No Child Left Behind.


The head of the House education committee is still waiting for Education Secretary Arne Duncan to explain his plan to waive some NCLB mandates.


The U.S. Department of Education will not let states disregard the No Child Left Behind Act, even if Congress fails to reauthorize it.


The U.S. Department of Education has spelled out what it's expecting from states who want to win part of the $500 million Race to the Top-Early Learning Challenge.


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