September 2011 Archives

Key formula programs would get huge increases, but big Obama priorities would get the axe under a fiscal 2012 spending plan from the House panel overseeing K-12 funding.


The Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee on Oct. 18 plans to consider a measure reauthorizing the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.


Based on the guidebook released by the U.S. Department of Education, peer reviewers will have to make important judgments about the quality of states' plans for waivers under No Child Left Behind.


The National Education Association is running ads backing the president's plan to provide $30 billion for education jobs and $25 billion for school modernization and repair.


Barack Obama, in his annual back-to-school speech, steers clear of controversy, asking students to pursue post-secondary study.


States that can't apply for No Child Left Behind waivers by mid-February can request to keep their proficiency targets at current levels as they apply for waivers in later rounds.


States will get an extra 15 months to implement the most challenging parts of the State Fiscal Stabilization Fund requirements, which include collecting higher-education data.


So far, state schools' chiefs are welcoming the Obama administration's waiver package, even though it does come with some significant strings.


Last night's GOP presidential debate offered the clearest sign yet that the Republican field is united on K-12 policy: Basically, they all want the feds out.


A plan unveiled today would waive key requirements of the No Child Left Behind Act, including the 2014 deadline for student proficiency in math and language arts.


President Barack Obama tomorrow will unveil long-awaited details of what states will have to do to gain some flexibility under No Child Left Behind. Let's recap what we already know, although the White House and Education Department could have made last-minute changes. And it will be interesting to see just what kind of changes officials do end up making. This will likely be an all-or-nothing waiver package, with states having to sign up for three kinds of waivers. And, in exchange, states would have to adopt certain policies or reform conditions. Over the summer, Politics K-12 detailed what those waivers ...


Overall education funding would remain stagnant, though some programs could see money restored, under a measure approved by the Senate Appropriations Committee.


A second national conference on bullying was yet another reminder of the current administration's emphasis on combating what is seen as a growing problem.


The nation's two largest teachers unions are among the top 100 donors to the 12 members of Congress who make up the powerful deficit-reduction panel, a campaign-contribution website says.


A group Republican presidential candidate Michele Bachmann belongs to leads opposition to acceptance of gay youths in a Minnesota school district that largely overlaps with her Congressional district.


Sen. Lamar Alexander and three colleagues announced a series of bills aimed at renewing pieces of No Child Left Behind, the current version of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.


The U.S. House of Representatives took what has become a rare step today: It passed an education bill with broad bipartisan support. But there was still a lot of drama behind the scenes.


First Lady Michelle Obama kicks off a new project for her Let's Move! campaign to curb childhood obesity.


President Barack Obama will go to an Ohio high school to make a pitch for the school construction piece of his jobs plan.


Texas Gov. Rick Perry spent much of tonight's GOP presidential candidates' debate defending his record as governor, including some issues touching on education policy.


So will Obama big jobs plan actually reinvigorate the sluggish economy? Rep. George Miller of California, the top Democrat on the House Education and the Workforce Committee, wants to know the answer to that question.


To qualify for $200 million in new Race to the Top grants, the nine runners-up from last year's state competition will have to maintain the same reform conditions that made them finalists in the first place.


Jobs to improve schools and teaching are a large part of the president's $447 billion vision for spurring the sputtering economy.


School choice, Race to the Top, and the state of education in Texas all came up in the latest debate between GOP candidates for president.


President Obama spoke with Dennis Van Roekel, the president of the nation's largest teachers union today and told him that school modernization and jobs (although not necessarily education jobs) will be a focus of his speech tomorrow.


States that just barely missed winning a Race to the Top grant can compete in Race to the Top Round 3: The All-Bridesmaid Edition.


School construction funding is the centerpiece of a bill to be introduced by Rep. Rosa DeLauro, D-Conn., top Democrat on the House appropriations panel that oversees K-12 spending.


Some U.S. senators are fighting a proposal that would cut the amount of potatoes, peas, corn, and lima beans served in school meals.


On the eve of Obama's job speech, Duncan is traveling to electorally important states to talk about education and the economy.


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