October 2011 Archives

Although there are no white potatoes in the White House garden, it appears a little white sugar may have made its way into the bags of trick-or-treaters who visited the President and First Lady for Halloween.


Republican presidential hopeful Herman Cain, who is leading in some polls, said calls to eliminate the U.S. Department of Education are premature.


Race to the Top winners Georgia, Hawaii, Massachusetts and North Carolina are singled out for not having ambitious teacher-evaluation policies.


The president will speed up a plan to cap student loan repayments at 10 percent of discretionary income as of 2012.


The Texas governor and GOP presidential hopeful would slash half of all federal aid for elementary and secondary education programs in his quest to cut $100 billion in non-defense spending.


The U.S. Department of Education will keep secret, for now, the names of the peer reviewers who will judge states' applications for waivers under No Child Left Behind.


The Obama administration's plan to grant waivers to states from No Child Left Behind is becoming part of a broader re-election strategy that's meant to emphasize the president's action in the face of Congressional deadlock.


Sounds like the Obama administration is less than thrilled with the accountability provisions in a bill passed out of the Senate education committee yesterday.


Some well-known education policy wonks get tough with the Race to the Top winners.


After a long delay, the Senate education committee has just approved a bill that would rewrite the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.


Obama's policy chief on domestic issues-including education-will leave at the end of this year.


The Early Learning Challenge Fund, a Race to the Top competition, has drawn interest from 35 states, plus D.C., who are competing for awards from $50 million to $100 million.


The Senate education committee rejects an effort to change assessments and standards for students with disabilities and debates options for low-performing schools in the second day of markup on an ESEA reauthorization bill.


A bill to renew the Elementary and Secondary Education Act has some bipartisan support in the Senate education committee, but it doesn't look like the markup is going to be love fest.


A broad basket of groups officially comes out against the ESEA reauthorization bill proposed by U.S. Sens. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, and Michael B. Enzi, R-Wyo., objecting chiefly to the bill's accountability provisions.


U.S. Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., says lawmakers haven't had enough time to digest the more-than 800-page bill to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.


After all the mud-slinging about spuds over the course of the year, the pro-potato set has been able to hash out a way to undo limits on serving potatoes in schools.


There are 144 amendments filed in advance of Wednesday's markup of a bill to reauthorize the ESEA. More than half are from Sen. Rand Paul.


The darling of students with disabilities in the U.S. Senate is now under fire for his proposed revision of NCLB that advocates say could allow students with disabilities to be overlooked.


Teacher evaluation has already been a sticky issue in the debate over reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. And now it's getting even stickier.


The latest ESEA renewal draft would require only districts that participate in the Teacher Incentive Fund to develop mandatory teacher evaluation systems.


The National Education Association and the America Association of School Administrators wants to put the brakes on rewrite of No Child Left Behind, at least on the bill Sen. Tom Harkin has proposed.


As part of a new No Child Left Behind, the Council of Chief State Schools Officers want more leeway in intervening in the lowest-performing schools, and in determining growth and performance targets.


The bill to be debated next week reflects "10 months of bipartisan negotiations."


Teacher evaluation is definitely an area to watch as the Senate debates a renewal of the No Child Left Behind Act.


California, New York, and Texas are among the states that did not tell the U.S. Department of Education they planned to apply for a waiver under No Child Left Behind.


Early reaction from the two national teachers' unions suggests teacher evaluation could be a sticking point.


Advocates for poor and minority students, students with disabilities, and others sent a letter to Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, and Sen. Michael B. Enzi, R-Wy., expressing deep concerns with legislation to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.


Proposed legislation would eliminate the 2013-14 deadline for bringing all students to proficiency in math and reading, but keep the law's testing regime in place.


Although Sept. 30 was the deadline for states to "obligate" the majority of their stimulus funds, some still have big balances left and, technically, have until Jan. 3 to deplete their funds.


The National Council of La Raza, which advocates for English-language learners, is worried about the potential impact of language in a widely circulated draft of a Senate plan to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.


Sen. Bennet is pleased that the committee appears poised to include salary comparability and Race to the Top in its ESEA renewal bill.


Race to the Top, first created under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, would become an authorized part of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act under a draft of Senate education leader's reauthorization propoal.


Now that the Senate is getting close to consideration of a bill to overhaul the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, groups are beginning to release their ideas on key aspects of the law, including teacher quality.


A draft NCLB proposal would put a strong federal focus on the lowest-performing schools and those with big achievement gaps.


Count the National Education Association as a fan (for the most part) of the No Child Left Behind Act renewal bill put forth last month by Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn.


If some folks had their way, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's proposed rules about school meals, in particular the part about potatoes, might be better off without a section limiting starchy veggies.


Some district officials would rather see increases for Title I grants for disadvantaged kids and special education than new money for the Obama reform priorities, including Race to the Top.


The American Jobs Act would save nearly 400,000 jobs, if states spent all the money in one year, according to a report released today by the White House.


The latest $30 million in grants to help schools and non-profits work together on wraparound services drew 234 applicants.


The legislation would create two funding streams. One would be aimed at improving teaching and learning, and the other would seek to bolster student health and safety.


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