December 2011 Archives

Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, the current GOP presidential frontruner, wants to see schools tout the benefits of marriage and pay their beginning teachers more.

Many of the big events involved the push to reauthorize ESEA, the recognition that the legislation was indeed going nowhere, and finally the acknowledgment that the accountability landscape would temporarily but significantly change as the Obama administration granted waivers under No Child Left Behind.

Lisa Graham Keegan, who served as a top adviser on K-12 issues during Sen. John McCain's bid for the presidency in 2008, is set to join former House Speaker Newt Gingrich's campaign.

Some states that narrowly missed out in last year's Race to the Top contest will split $200 million to fund small pieces of their original plans, the Education Department announces.

The U.S. Department of Education is restricting Hawaii's access to its $75 million grant and planning an extensive on-site review after the state's "unsatisfactory performance" during the first year of Race to the Top.

U.S. Secretary of Education Ane Duncan won't yet commit to using new Race to the Top funding for early-learning.

Most states have not completed work the U.S. Department of Education wants done in conjunction with issuing waivers under the No Child Left Behind Act, according to a pair of reports from the Center on Education Policy.

The 23 winners of this year's Investing in Innovation program can now start implementing their programs after meeting the deadline to secure up to 15 percent in private, matching funds.

Four states were identified in a new Center for American Progress report as having key missing pieces in their NCLB waiver plans: Georgia, Kentucky, New Jersey, and Oklahoma.

Five organizations will get grants to create communities that offer wrap-around services, such as health programs, to boost education.

The nine winners of the Race to the Top early learning contest are surely rejoicing at their good fortune. But three states may be especially bummed out about the results.

GOP lawmakers on the House education committee are likely to write a Republican-only version of a bill renewing the Elementary and Secondary Education, a House GOP aide said.

Six states of the nine states that will share $500 million are repeat Race to the Top winners: Delaware, Massachusetts, Maryland, North Carolina, Ohio, and Rhode Island.

The Community-Based Abstinence Education program has the potential to be resurrected, and grow, based on Congressional action this week.

Big priorities for President Barack Obama, including the administration's signature Race to the Top initiative, the Investing in Innovation grant program, and the School Improvement Grants, would continue.

U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan's warning about the proportion of schools that would "fail" under NCLB this year if Congress didn't rewrite the law was 34 percentage points too high, says a new Center on Education Policy report.

Check out Education Week's series of stories on what's inside the applications for No Child Left Behind waivers that 11 states have submitted so far to the U.S. Department of Education.

A House bill would require those seeking Unemployment Insurance to have a high school diploma, a GED, or be working toward one to receive benefits.

Race to the Top will continue in fiscal year 2012, and for the first time it will include a district-level competition, sources say.

Remember how First Lady Michelle Obama was trying to break a world record about jumping jacks? She did it

Newt Gingrich's comment that child labor laws should be changed to give students a chance to work in their school buildings was an early flashpoint in the latest GOP presidential debate.

More school-based health clinics will be upgraded, expanded, or built from scratch, and they will eventually add enough capacity to serve about 53,000 students across the country, thanks to a fresh infusion of federal cash.

GOP Presidential candidate Rick Perry has launched a new campaign ad, promising to end "Obama's war on religion", including limits on prayer in schools.

Montana schools' chief Denise Juneau cited the financial cost as one reason her state won't seek a waiver from No Child Left Behind.

Does Gingrich's record on K-12 make him an education-flip-flopper...or someone with nuanced, evolving positions?

Getting rid of the U.S. Department of Education is high on the wish list of Republican voters in Iowa, who next month hold the first-in-the-nation caucus to select a GOP presidential nominee.

New guidelines meant to clarify what educators may legally do to achieve diversity and reduce racial isolation in schools.

The first round of state applications for flexibility under the No Child Left Behind Act raises significant questions about the future of state-led accountability systems.

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