April 2013 Archives

To get its waiver, Indiana attested that it had adopted the Common Core State Standards and is participating in a testing consortium. Both are now in doubt.


A new survey from the Partnership for Public Service reports that Education Department employees give their agency lower-than-average marks for innovation.


Republicans and Democrats are each hoping to make their case to mothers (and parents in general) in advance of the 2014 midterm election.


U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan says he thinks the time has come for a sweeping expansion of early-childhood education programs and wants to get as many states as possible on board.


Eight civil rights groups warn that granting a waiver to nine California districts will create a loophole for future independent waivers under the No Child Left Behind Act.


U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, speaking before a key Indiana vote, said if states want to "dummy down" standards that's their right.


A group of 20 education scholars release a new book and launch a national campaign to get policymakers to focus on leveling the playing field for poor and minority students.


The House education committee is getting ready to tackle reauthorization of the Higher Education Act.


K-12 education overhaul may be on the back burner in Congress these days, but immigration reform sure isn't.


The debate and rhetoric over the common standards is really heating up.


Republicans questions on implementation pinpoint the political and policy challenges inherent in the NCLB waivers.


Congress wouldn't pump another penny into encouraging stats to adopt the common core standards, or overseeing their implementation if Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, has his way.


Fans of bipartisan-backed school safety and mental health bills will have to find another legislative vehicle for their programs.


After a standoff that lasted two years, the Hawaii State Teachers Association approved a contract that ties evaluations and pay raises to student test scores.


Arne Duncan questioned whether Congress would ever be able to agree on rewriting No Child Left Behind if politicians couldn't agree to tighten gun control in the wake of Newtown.


The U.S. Secretary of Education endures some pointed questioning on the Obama administration's education-funding priorities at a Senate hearing on the president's proposed budget.


About $120 million in new Race to the Top funds will go to a second round of the district competition.


A new set of "action steps" from a leading civil rights organization says that the federal government can, and should, do more to ensure that school funding is equitable.


Jim Shelton, the U.S. Department of Education's assistant secretary for innovation and improvement, is to take on an even bigger role at the department early next month.


When you think of the current debates about education redesign, who do you think are key players who can really shape policy or rhetoric?


The president's budget proposal would use a new tax on tobacco products to expand federal aid for preschool programs and for a new competitive-grant program for high school overhaul.


Schools would be encouraged to expand the use of positive behavior support services, and take other steps to help address students' mental health under bipartisan bill.


Guest post by Nirvi Shah So which of the Head Start providers on a watch list by the federal government didn't make the cut during the first attempt at accountability for the decades-old pre-K program? It's hard to say. And the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services won't, either. Last week, my colleague Christina Samuels wrote on the Early Years blog that 25 of 125 low-performing Head Start providers that went through a recompetition process to maintain federal funding lost money to serve the regions they have been serving for years, in many cases. Though HHS's Head Start ...


How specific will the administration's fiscal year 2014 budget be when it comes to new programs on prekindergarten and high school improvement?


The administration reportedly proposes covering at least part of the prekindergarten expansion by raising federal taxes on cigarettes and other tobacco products.


Organizers of Occupy DOE 2.0 inveighed against high-stakes testing and the "dismantling of public education" as they gathered to protest in Washington.


Key parts of the U.S. Department of Education's website have been down after federal officials detected "suspicious activity" on Friday and moved to "protect the integrity of the site."


Second-ranking Republican in the U.S. House of Representatives has become very interested in K-12, especially school choice.


School districts would be able to tap into grants to help upgrade their safety infrastructure.


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