April 2014 Archives

No Child Left Behind waivers are not having a very good week on Capitol Hill.


Michele McNeil is leaving Education Week for a new opportunity at the College Board, but Politics K-12 will live on and thrive.


It's worth noting that funding for special education has been a key issue in Rep. John Kline's suburban Minnesota district, where voters narrowly backed President Barack Obama in 2012.


Release of the new guidance coincides with the announcement of task force findings related to sexual assault on college and university campuses.


Key members of Congress told Secretary of Education Arne Duncan today that they're having a hard time following the administration's thinking when it comes to waiver policy.


Like Washington state, which became the first to get its waiver revoked, Michigan doesn't require assessment data to be used in teacher evaluations.


Minority students, students in special education, disadvantaged students, and English Language Learners, are making modest gains overall when it comes to on-time graduation rates.


The Obama Administration will release draft accountability rules for the nation's teacher-preparation programs this summer.


The first lady will instead speak at a "Senior Recognition Day."


U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan yanked Washington state's waiver Thursday, making the Evergreen State the first to lose flexibility from many of the mandates of the outdated No Child Left Behind Act.


U.S. Secretary Arne Duncan has already decided whether to revoke Washington state's No Child Left Behind waiver, according to a Seattle Times story. But we still don't know exactly what the decision is.


Race to the Top started out as a competition among states who agreed to embrace certain K-12 education redesign principles—but it didn't stay that way.


Applications will be available Friday for schools and nonprofits that want a shot at the largest awards available from this year's $135 million i3 contest.


Plans to combine ceremonies for the city's five high schools may mean fewer guests for each graduate, which some families have objected to.


At long last, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan has granted his home state of Illinois a waiver from the mandates of the No Child Left Behind Act.


After dropping out of Smarter Balanced, Kansas had to submit a special double-testing waiver to use common-core aligned field tests for students in special education.


Here's an edited transcript of a 30-minute Q-and-A with the U.S. Secretary of Education, who touched on the important decisions he's facing in his remaining time in office.


U.S. Rep. Dave Loebsack, an Iowan who is a major champion of rural schools, has been tapped to serve as the top Democrat on the House subcommittee that deals with K-12 policy.


In an interview, the U.S. Secretary of Education said he wants to support implementation of common standards and overhaul teacher-prep rules. Rewriting NCLB wasn't tops on his list.


In addition to leading the rocky Affordable Care Act rollout, Kathleen Sebelius presided over a big change in how the Health and Human Services Department awards aid for the preschool program.


Can the Senate education committee produce a bipartisan bill to expand pre-kindergarten? Probably not, but it sounds like Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, the chairman of the panel wants to give it a shot.


The California district and its teachers' union announced today they are withdrawing from a first-of-its-kind No Child Left Behind waiver the U.S. Department of Education granted less than a year ago.


An official announcement could come later this month—and, if the waiver is pulled, as expected, the move would make the Evergreen State the first to lose its flexibility.


At a congressional hearing, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan answered questions about the common core and competitive grants, while testifying about his $68.6 billion budget request for the U.S. Department of Education.


With movement stalled on big, politically charged pieces of legislation, such as the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, lawmakers are instead tackling targeted issues where it's easier to garner bipartisan support.


Ten Republican senators don't want to see another dime of federal money going to states in exchange for adopting certain academic standards.


Winners of the largest $7 million grants include New York City, Denver, Los Angeles, Pike Township in Indianapolis, and Prince George's County in Maryland.


A bipartisan rewrite of the Education Sciences Reform Act says that no funds can be used to "coerce [states'] curriculum or academic standards or assessments," a GOP summary says.


The bill would call for educators to have a seat at the table in setting research policy, bolster state longitudinal data systems, and protect student privacy.


The inspector general for the U.S. Department of Education found weaknesses in test security, monitoring, and risk analysis in an audit of five state testing systems.


Rep. Mark Takano, a former teacher from Riverside, Calif., has been tapped to serve on the House Education and the Workforce Committee.


States and districts would be encouraged to help grow high-quality charter schools—and ensure that they enroll and retain English-language learners and students in special education—under a bipartisan bill in Congress.


At Education Week's "Leaders to Learn From" live event in Washington, top federal policymakers discussed their role in school improvement.


A budget blueprint from Rep. Paul Ryan would dramatically alter the Pell Grant program and other K-12 spending by the federal government.


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