January 2015 Archives

School Improvement Grant funding mattered, the Council of the Great City Schools found, and it was mostly the money, not the federally mandated turnaround models, that made the difference.


The biggest policy debate emerging in the reauthorization process is whether or not to preserve the law's annual testing requirements.


The Volunteer State will soon consider a resolution that asks Congress to ensure that Washington doesn't intrude into the state's decisions about public schools.


President Barack Obama announced Thursday that his fiscal year 2016 budget request will include a 7 percent hike in spending above the funding limits that Congress set back in 2011.


Rep. John Kline, R-Minn., plans to forego hearings on reauthorization and use the bill he ushered through the House in the 113th Congress as the starting point for the legislative process.


A draft of the Obama administration's "Student Digital Privacy and Innovation Act" would prohibit companies from targeting advertising to students and selling data about them, but appears to leave other issues unaddressed.


Human trafficking is more common and more difficult to identify than many educators may realize, experts say.


Boehner was an architect of the original NCLB law when he served as chairman of the House education committee back in 2001.


Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., chairman of the Senate education committee, said the research bill is important to the committee's work in reauthorizing the No Child Left Behind Act.


The head of the House education committee stressed that keeping the No Child Left Behind Act's testing regime intact is necessary, but would ditch the law's punitive sanctions.


Members of the Senate education committee agreed at a hearing that teacher evaluations are essential, but it's still unlikely that the NCLB reauthorization will mandate them.


How can parents make smart decisions about where to spend their vouchers or which charter schools to pick if they don't have annual testing data at their fingertips?


The Coalition for Community Schools drew from recent Office of Civil Rights data to show how school climate and civil rights issues have suffered under the current law.


Advocates for school districts see Title I portability as a pit-stop on the highway that leads to voucherville.


What's high on National Education Association president Lily Eskelsen Garcia's wish list for renewal of the No Child Left Behind Act?


The administration is entering into the waiver-renewal process with a severely weakened hand when it comes to holding states' feet to the fire on teacher evaluation.


The feds told Texas that its teacher evaluation system isn't coming close to cutting the mustard when it comes to what's expected for states with NCLB waivers.


The Consortium for Citizens with Disabilities' education task force, a coalition of more than 20 groups, said eliminating the cap would "wipe out a decade of progress."


Education watchers were disappointed last month, when a promising bipartisan-backed bill failed to make it through the lame-duck session.


Rice has close ties to Bush's family, having served as secretary of state under Jeb Bush's brother, former President George W. Bush, from 2005 to 2009.


The Obama administration wants to expand eligibility for child-care programs and bolster quality.


John Kline, R-Minn., chairman of the House education committee, said he will use the Student Success Act, the bill he ushered through the House in the 113th Congress, as the starting point for the legislative process.


The U.S. Department of Education has offered seven states an early deadline and a very special, expedited review process for renewing their No Child Left Behind waivers, but not everyone is taking it up on the offer.


The panel's priorities for a Head Start rewrite include reducing unnecessary regulatory burdens and boosting coordination between Head Start and state and local programs.


After two-and-a-half hours of hearing from a diverse panel of witnesses, chairman Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., still hadn't come down on one side of the testing debate.


President Barack Obama used his penultimate State of the Union address to call for a dramatic expansion in college access and increased investments in early childhood.


During the NCLB reauthorization process, Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Conn., said he'll "be judging the draft and every amendment to the draft in part by whether it preserves the gains we've made for kids with learning disabilities."


The measure, co-sponsored by Rep. Suzanne Bonamici, D-Ore., and Sen. Tammy Baldwin, D-Wis., comes just one day before the Senate education committee's hearing on testing and accountability.


President Obama is expected to make the case that his broader tax proposal will help families cover the cost of child care and gain access to college for their children.


The Senate education committee will hear from a presidential adviser, a state commissioner, a superintendent, a teacher, and a civil rights leader during its hearing on testing and accountability.


A proposal from U.S. Sen. Pat Roberts, R-Kan., illustrates the amount of pressure Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., chairman of the Senate education committee, will be under to craft a conservative approach to the law's reauthorization.


Testing is eating up a lot of the oxygen, but there's lots more to unpack in Sen. Lamar Alexander's No Child Left Behind draft.


In order to craft an overhaul of the federal K-12 education law that can clear the committee, the full Senate, and the president's desk, Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., will have to sharpen his politicking skills.


The two national teachers' unions, which collectively represent more than 4.6 million educators, are some of the most important (and powerful) groups that will try to shape the draft going forward.


More tidbits on Elementary and Secondary Education Act reauthorization: The draft proposal could change the approach to using research in approving education plans.


The Kentucky senator and likely presidential candidate just happened to be in the first primary state Wednesday to attack the Common Core State Standards, an issue championed by his likely opponent, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush.


The American Federation of Teachers and the Center on American Progress say annual tests should be retained for reporting purposes, but scaled back for school-accountability purposes.


Adding extra time to the day or year is a lot easier said than done, according to a report released Tuesday by the Center on Education Policy


The top Democrat on the Senate education committee said annual tests are "one of the most important tools we have," and would be "very concerned" about any proposal to roll them back.


Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., chairman of the Senate education committee, kicked off the reauthorization of the No Child Left Behind Act by saying he wants to start a dialogue about testing.


The forthcoming budget proposal will include $2.7 billion in increased federal K-12 spending, including $1 billion for Title I grants that fund districts with large numbers of low-income students.


Murray, who is known as an effective dealmaker, has a great incentive to compromise with Republicans: Her home state of Washington is the only ex-waiver state in the country.


U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan is clearly not backing off from the K-12 policies that his administration has pushed for the past six years.


Blueprints for reauthorizing the Elementary and Secondary Education Act law have been flooding in from various stakeholders as lawmakers in both chambers begin work on a bill.


The education secretary won't back away from policies the Obama administration has embraced from the get-go, a senior administration official has signaled.


A look back at prior attempts to renew the federal law makes one thing clear: We're drifting further and further away from the idea of a strong federal role in K-12 accountability.


As states try new ways to keep college costs down, some have voiced criticism of the free-tuition-for-all approach for helping families who may not need assistance.


The Council of Chief State School Officers urges Congress to pass a bipartisan revision of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act that would keep the NCLB testing schedule intact.


If Congress were to enact the proposal, approximately 9 million students would be eligible for the federal-state partnership program.


As Congress gears up to reauthorize the No Child Left Behind Act, the administration may well lose a lot of the ground it's gained on teacher evaluation, school turnarounds, and assessments.


One of the most significant policy debates at the heart of the forthcoming reauthorization will be how or if to change the law's testing requirements.


Special education organizations join the debate having lost two of their biggest champions on Capitol Hill, when Rep. George Miller, D-Calif., and Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, retired.


Most recently a vice president at the Education Trust, Miller is a former college professor, but also has plenty of K-12 credibility.


Our hope for a busy education calendar is bolstered by the education committee chairmen, who have signaled their intent to get an Elementary and Secondary Education Act reauthorization through committee by Valentine's Day.


Is this some new strategy at 400 Maryland Ave. for filling top positions without having to deal with the difficult process of getting nominees through Congress?


Among other things, Cuomo attempted to overhaul New York City's flailing education system and steer more state aid to poor districts across the state.


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