February 2015 Archives

It's possible that leaders will find the votes to pass the bill next week—but if they don't the bid to update the NCLB law this year could be in serious trouble.


House leaders may hold off on a final vote on a Republican-backed bill to rewrite the No Child Left Behind law, amid pushback from powerful GOP lobbying groups


The chamber will reconvene again Friday morning to consider three additional amendments, including one that would wholesale replace the measure with a Democratic version, before holding a final vote on the entire bill.


The House rules committee will allow 44 of the 125 amendments filed to the GOP-backed rewrite of the No Child Left Behind Act to be debated Thursday.


There was never a doubt that the administration was going to threaten to veto this bill. The big question is whether lawmakers in the Senate can produce a bipartisan product that can actually get some support from Obama.


Republicans who don't think the House No Child Left Behind Act rewrite goes far enough in restoring education decisions to the states could gum up the works in floor debate.


Scratch beneath the surface of a White House analysis and it seems highly unlikely that the funding impact would be nearly as dire as the administration warns.


The bulk of the 125 amendments came from Democrats who are seeking to restore accountability and dedicated funding streams for certain education programs.


Making public schools work better is a "personal mission" for many governors, said Gov. Brian Sandoval, a Nevada Republican, at a National Governors Association meeting.


Duncan is worried about the impact of funding provisions, and a lack of investment in teacher quality, pre-kindergarten programs, and initiatives like Investing in Innovation.


The U.S. Secretary of Education is criticizing Republicans for not imposing limits on testing in the same breath he's calling for keeping annual, statewide assessments.


A new schedule would send the Republican-backed No Child Left Behind rewrite to the floor for debate Wednesday and Thursday, with a final vote scheduled for Friday morning.


Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., who is almost definitely running for president, is trying to make a big issue of his potential opponents' support of the Common Core State Standards.


A majority of the potential Iowa GOP electorate would find a presidential candidate's common-core support acceptable, but it's pretty much a dead heat in two other states.


U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, one of Obama's staunchest opponents on immigration, said the ruling is a "major turning point in the fight to stop Obama's lawless amnesty."


U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan has been warning against a GOP NCLB rewrite bill that's slated to pass the House next week.


The NEA and AFT have launched separate grass-roots lobbying efforts in hopes of continuing to push their priorities for the federal K-12 overhaul.


Republicans in both chambers plan to push Title I portability further during floor debate by offering amendments that would allow Title I money to also be used for private schools.


The report criticizes the bill's appropriation levels, which would lock in current funding levels through fiscal 2021, capping spending for the next six years at $800 million lower than it was in fiscal 2012.


The national, four-year graduation rate has ticked up for the second year in a row, growing from 80 percent in the 2011-12 school year, to 81 percent in the 2012-13 school year.


A Republican bill to overhaul the No Child Left Behind Act, which would significantly curtail the federal footprint in K-12, will be considered by the full House the week of Feb. 24.


The Title I aid formula is highly complicated, but in a nutshell, the money is distributed to districts based on their size and concentration of poverty, among other factors.


The Democrats' substitute bill would create a new title for early-childhood education that would provide funds through a formula to states willing to match the amount.


Bush, the former Florida governor who is mulling a White House run, advocated for choice, assessment, and a low-profile for federal policymakers in K-12.


The chairman and ranking member on the Senate education committee aren't on the same page when it comes to a timeline for rewriting the No Child Left Behind law.


On the right, lawmakers will offer amendments to further reduce the footprint of the federal government, and on the left, members will try to wholesale replace the federal K-12 measure with one of their own.


Evergreen State policymakers are making a fresh push to regain the state's flexibility under the No Child Left Behind Act, even as Congress mulls an NCLB overhaul.


The real star of the day, however, was Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, the Republican presidential hopeful who is spending the early part of this week in the nation's capital.


The U.S. Secretary of Education wants to preserve Investing in Innovation, an Obama administration competitive-grant program that would be scrapped under Republican legislation to overhaul the No Child Left Behind Act.


Congress mulls a rewrite of the No Child Left Behind Act that could roll back the law's testing requirements—or let districts create their own systems, with state approval.


Please Stop Punitive High Stakes Testing! That was the message that poured into the inboxes of congressional staffers taking the lead on rewriting the No Child Left Behind Act this morning ... more than 800 times.


Sens. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., and Patty Murray, D-Wash., plan to work over the next few weeks to produce a bipartisan bill.


During the panel, Democrats worried that a bill from Rep. John Kline, R-Minn., to rewrite the No Child Left Behind Act would hurt the most-disadvantaged students.


States can cook up their own turnaround interventions for low-performing schools using federal SIG dollars and submit them to the U.S. Secretary of Education for approval.


The U.S. Secretary of Education is unhappy about what he sees as a lack of resources and accountability in GOP legislation to rewrite the No Child Left Behind Act.


The California Department of Education is seeking a one-year reprieve from the U.S. Department of Education from the use of student performance on Smarter Balanced assessments in determining school performance.


The House education committee will mark up a proposal to overhaul the No Child Left Behind Act on Feb. 11, and the House will debate the measure the week of Feb. 24.


When it comes to Washington's role, experts seem to agree that, "it's the strict federal accountability system that's the problem, not the tests," Alexander said.


Letting Title I dollars for disadvantaged kids follow students to the public school of their choice would end up diluting the program's focus on children in poverty.


Under the current U.S. Senate draft to overhaul the No Child Left Behind Act, 67 federal education programs would be eliminated or not reauthorized.


If you're familiar with the Student Success Act, which passed the U.S. House of Representatives in 2013 on a party-line vote, this bill should seem like old hat.


A draft bill in the U.S. Senate that would roll back the federal footprint in education is drawing mixed reactions.


The fiscal year 2016 budget request of $70.7 billion for the U.S. Department of Education also would include increases for teacher-quality programs and civil rights enforcement.


Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Most Viewed on Education Week

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments