March 2015 Archives

Kentucky, Minnesota, North Carolina, New Mexico, and Virginia will get to keep their waivers for another four years, through 2018-19, or beyond the end of the Obama administration.

The first batch of NCLB waiver states to file renewal applications are generally seeking modest changes, as opposed to big revisions.

Say "Aloha" to the U.S. Department of Education's new deputy assistant secretary for policy and programs in the Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, Ronn Nozoe, who is currently Hawaii's deputy superintendent.

Development grants are the smallest of the Education Department's three i3 categories and are aimed at promising ideas, as opposed to programs with a lot of backup research.

Among other things, the bill would extend the Secure Rural School Act, which provides hundreds of millions of dollars to rural counties to provide consistent support for more than 4,400 schools located near national forest areas.

Senators plan to offer amendments on a range of education policies, including the Common Core State Standards, charter schools, and student loans, to name a few.

The issue of school turn-arounds could simply be one of several threads in a conversation about accountability, which we know is the crux of ongoing Senate negotiations.

The NEA is getting started on its 2016 presidential endorsement process extra early this year—while at the same time trying to shine a spotlight on the issue of education in general, the union's president, Lilly Eskelsen Garcia told reporters.

The U.S. Secretary of Education has about 18 months left in office and lots of initiatives up in the air, including school turnarounds, teacher evaluation, and an NCLB rewrite.

The Medicare bill, if it passes, would also extend for two years the Children's Health Insurance Plan, or CHIP.

Sen. Lamar Alexander said the federal government already spends about $22 billion annually on various early-education programs, but the money is fragmented and often ineffective.

In a talk to state schools chiefs, the House education committee chairman called the collapse of floor support for his GOP-backed bill "the perfect storm."

Any ESEA reauthorization proposal that simply passes on a party-line vote, Education Secretary Arne Duncan said, is "not policy, that's politics," and he worried that progress on reauthorization will continue to stall.

Senator-turned-presidential candidate Ted Cruz's education platform could be described, in a nutshell, as Not Jeb Bush.

States need to count on a permanent federal education policy, the head of the Council of Chief State School Officers told the group's annual legislative conference Monday.

Nearly every state with a waiver plans to file a renewal request, we found. But, in Louisiana and Texas, renewal is complicated.

Colorado and Kentucky are eyeing flexibility similar to what New Hampshire got. Meanwhile, Colorado is seeking other big testing changes, including on opt-outs.

Colorado wants to add language to its No Child Left Behind Act waiver through the renewal process, ensuring that opt-outs don't count against a school's 95 percent participation threshold.

The U.S. Senate's fiscal 2016 budget proposal would fund the federal government to the tune of $493 billion, keeping in place the across-the-board spending caps under sequestration.

The House Republican spending plan includes $493 billion for discretionary spending across the federal government and would make $5.5 trillion in spending reductions in the next 10 years.

Congressional efforts to give the outdated No Child Left Behind Act a facelift headlined this year's Council of the Great City Schools annual legislative conference.

Graduation rates for black students in the 2012-13 school year was 70.7 percent and for Hispanic students was 75.2 percent, but white and Asian/Pacific Islander students still out-performed both other groups.

Prospective grantees would be urged to pitch projects designed to increase the number and percentage of students who graduate from high school ready for postsecondary education and the workforce.

The U.S. Department of Education's Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Policy Development is getting ready to "waive" hello to a new hire, from Bellwether Education Associates.

U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan is pushing to close a loophole in the NCLB law that he says shortchanges poor and minority students.

At the National Science Teachers Association's annual conference this afternoon, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan spoke about standards and "overtesting," and was questioned on an encounter with parent protesters.

As states roll out new assessments aligned to the Common Core State Standards, they're also considering, or reconsidering, how to use them in accountability systems.

Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., said the amendment offered by Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Pa., would bolster the U.S. Department of Education's role as "a National School Board."

The Washington state Senate took a critical step toward regaining the state's waiver from many of the mandates of the No Child Left Behind Act.

What are John King's plans and priorities as the Obama administration draws to a close?

The announcement comes a little more than a week after GOP leaders in the U.S. House of Representatives abandoned a vote on a GOP-backed overhaul bill.

Nebraska is poised to apply for a waiver from the No Child Left Behind Act, after years of not seeking that flexibility.

State renewals of NCLB waivers are very much in progress, including in states that have faced some waiver angst lately, such as Utah and Maine.

Clinton voted for the law as a senator, but by the time she ran for president in 2008, was critical of what she saw as its punitive nature.

The state will be allowed to use competency-based tests developed by local and state officials, trying them out with a handful of districts in lieu of statewide tests.

A couple of "grassroots" education bloggers may have had a hand in stalling—or maybe even outright stopping—the legislation.

Education Secretary Arne Duncan urged Congress to approve $70.7 billion in discretionary spending for the U.S. Department of Education, an increase of $3.6 billion over fiscal 2015.

The voucher program, which provides low-income students with up to $12,000 for use at private schools, is no stranger to testy funding battles.

Amy McIntosh, who is currently the principal deputy assistant secretary in the Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Policy Development, will help fill his role.

House Republican leaders delayed a vote on rewriting the No Child Left Behind Act Friday. So is an NCLB update all-dead for the year, or only mostly dead?

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