April 2015 Archives

Delisle, who was confirmed in 2012 as assistant secretary for elementary and secondary education, played a key role in bringing a state chief's voice to the U.S. Department of Education.

Sanders has a track record on testing, teacher quality, and higher education policy.

The U.S. Department of Education will award five to seven demonstration grants ranging from $400,000 to $600,000 to tribal communities.

The president underscored that his administration has put a priority on programs aimed at helping communities plagued by chronic poverty, high crime, and low graduation rates.

A revamped federal student-data-privacy bill would cover more student information, allow fewer uses of that data, and impose new requirements on ed-tech vendors.

If California were to get permission to do its own tutoring, it would essentially shed yet another irksome aspect of the law, without having to jump through the Obama administration's waiver hoops.

Under NCLB waivers, states have to identify 5 percent of their lowest performing schools for major interventions. But that hasn't always gone super smoothly.

Schools must have well-trained Title IX coordinators who are visible and known to students, the U.S. Department of Education said in guidance released Friday.

Staffers from different committees and agencies are trying to coordinate various funding streams and devise ways to fast track money to help repair crumbling facilities that house many federally funded schools in Indian Country.

Sen. Jon Tester, D-Mont., introduced legislation Tuesday that would roll back the current annual testing schedule in rewriting the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.

Arne Duncan fielded questions from reporters around the country at the Education Writers Association's conference in Chicago.

A Senate agreement on a bill to prevent human trafficking showcases how unrelated pieces of legislation may determine the fate of a particular bill awaiting floor debate.

On the third day of its markup, the committee approved three amendments that focused on the funding formula for Title II, which deals with issues like teacher preparation.

U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan warned lawmakers that cuts to education programs could hurt efforts to close the achievement gap for disadvantaged children.

What had been a relatively calm legislative process produced a more-passionate debate over a pair of dueling amendments on harassment and bullying, particularly of LGBT students.

Montana has just decided to make testing under the Smarter Balanced assessment optional, after some serious technical glitches.

The GOP-controlled committee on Wednesday morning approved amendments by Democrats on issues including expanding access to STEM subjects and letting states use funding to create teacher and principal academies.

Senators punted on more than a dozen controversial amendments on the first day of marking up a bipartisan bill to overhaul the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.

Clinton counts herself a fan of dual enrollment programs' role in preparing students for college, and says there hasn't been enough investment in education.

Chairman Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., and ranking member Patty Murray, D-Wash., have the difficult task of preserving the compromise bill they spent two months crafting.

Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., who announced his candidacy for president Monday, is the third pro-school-choice, common-core-skeptical Republican senator to throw his hat in the ring.

Districts expect that financial considerations will be the biggest hurdle in sustaining Race to the Top reforms.

The measure plays to Republican sensibilities by allowing states to better coordinate federal education programs that already exist, including Head Start and the Child Care Development Block Grant and the Preschool Development Grant programs.

Education organizations are writing to the Senate education committee and pushing out policy critiques of the bipartisan No Child Left Behind rewrite in an effort to highlight their specific priorities for the legislation.

Senators on the education committee have until Monday at 10 AM to file their amendments, and with Chairman Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., promising an open markup process, there's likely to be a considerable number.

The former U.S. Secretary of State and first lady's record on teacher issues, standards, and early education could offer clues to her 2016 presidential edu-platform.

Chafee has been supportive of the Obama administration's education agenda; as governor, he oversaw the rollout of the state's $75 million Race to the Top grant and a $50 million early-learning grant.

The last time the Senate voted on a reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act was when it debated the No Child Left Behind Act back in 2001, meaning most current senators have never cast a vote on K-12 law.

Education Secretary Arne Duncan used the 50th anniversary of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act's passage to emphasize education's role in bolstering civil rights and access to opportunity.

The shift in the definition of "core academic subjects" appears to be something of a response to the years-old debate about NCLB's curriculum-narrowing effect.

So far, states haven't shown a ton of interest in trying out a new School Improvement Grant model that relies heavily on evidence.

The Senate education committee is slated to mark up the bill April 14 when lawmakers in both chambers will be back in Washington after a two-week recess.

Add one more unabashed foe of the Common Core State Standards to the list of Republican presidential candidates: Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky.

The letter to members of Congress from the national organization and most of its state affiliates comes at a precarious time for lawmakers trying to overhaul the law.

Unions and civil rights groups are seeking to influence the legislative process in advance of Senate committee consideration of a bill to rewrite the No Child Left Behind Act.

Among other things, sources say the version now being negotiated would not make Title I dollars for low-income students portable, and would maintain the current annual testing schedule.

It's official! Every single state that currently has a waiver from the No Child Left Behind Act has filed for a renewal, or is about to.

Opposition to the federal role in education didn't suddenly spring up when the Obama administration hugged the Common Core State standards a little too tightly

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