June 2015 Archives

Next week, the U.S. Senate is slated to start debating a rewrite of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. One of the big points of contention to watch? Expanding school choice.


Christie made his presidential announcement at the Livingston, N.J. high school, which he attended and where he said he developed many of his traits that served him well later in public office.


Under one vision, states and the federal government would set goals for student achievement, but the states would be able to use any strategies they wanted to get there.


The 2016 election season is just getting started, but there's already a favorite sport among GOP contenders: Hitting Jeb Bush for his support of the Common Core standards.


So the big news of the day wasn't education related, but the U.S. Department of Education is celebrating all the same, at least on social media.


Get beyond the Beltway for a moment. Which curriculum directors, superintendents, parent engagement administrators, and others have the best ideas?


Democrats on the committee unsuccessfully attempted to restore funding for a host of education programs that were eliminated or gutted in the Senate appropriations bill.


The bill would slash $2.8 billion in education funding, even as a larger debate looms over whether Congress will strike a deal to avert across-the-board funding cuts.


Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., scheduled the measure for floor debate for July 7, just one day after 10 major education groups joined forces to demand senators prioritize the measure.


The fiscal 2016 spending proposal would slash funding for a slew of programs and eliminate about 10, including Investing in Innovation, Preschool Development Grants, and Striving Readers.


Oregon Gov. Kate Brown has signed a bill requiring districts to notify parents of their right to opt their children out of standardized exams.


Eight waiver recipients—Georgia, Hawaii, Nevada, New York, Missouri, Kansas, West Virginia, and the District of Columbia—can hang onto their flexibility from No Child Left Behind Act provisions.


A bipartisan measure authored by Sens. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., and Patty Murray, D-Wash., has awaited floor debate for weeks, but has been passed over in favor of other priorities.


Seeking the union's endorsement means answering questions on everything from vouchers to testing to the minimum wage.


Even so, Sens. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., and Patty Murray, D-Wash, the influential co-authors of that chamber's bipartisan bill, still have their eyes on the prize.


We've spent the week focusing on the timing for the Elementary and Secondary Education Act reauthorization, as well as appropriations and campaign news. But lots of other federal news happened, too.


Now that the Obama administration's competitive grant programs are on the wane, can districts sustain the work funded through those efforts?


Two more candidates for the Democratic presidential nomination, former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley and U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, made their case to the union Thursday.


A coalition of 36 organizations say in a letter to senators that without changes, the bipartisan ESEA measure "will not fulfill its functions as a civil rights law."


Florida got flexibility on English Language Learners and accountability. Now at least seven other states are also asking for similar for those students.


The subcommittee markup is the first to occur in more than three years, as Congress has been dysfunctional in its ability to draft fiscal year spending bills.


The House Appropriations Committee bill would fund the Education Department to the tune of $64.4 billion, which is $2.8 billion below the fiscal year 2015 level and $6.4 billion below the president's budget request.


Trump also ran a for-profit college that was sued by New York for misleading students. And he's a fan of school choice.


A bipartisan bill could hit the Senate floor as early as this week, and members plan to file amendments on Title I, accountability, bullying, and employee background checks.


The Democratic presidential candidate wants to give every 4-year-old in America access to high-quality preschool over the next decade.


Bush, who served two terms as Florida governor before leaving the office in 2007, has perhaps the most extensive and complicated track record in education among all the Republican candidates.


The Education Department's budget pitch for the next fiscal year includes a request for more money for departmental management, in light of fewer full-time employees and a growing workload.


The measure was not on the Majority Leader's weekly schedule for action, but sources said it could be called to the floor as early as Wednesday.


The Obama administration has created a new competitive grant program called "Skills for Success" aimed at helping middle school kids develop traits like grit and resilience.


There haven't been many signs that House Republican leadership is interested in the subject, but there's a big bipartisan push in the Senate to address the entire criminal justice system, which could give it wings.


The stalled renewal of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act could start moving again in the U.S. House of Representatives, sources say.


The Investing in Innovation program will have been worthwhile, even if some of the grantees haven't yielded the results they were initially hoping for, a top official at the Department said.


Gov. Scott Walker, R-Wisc., is expected to announce his presidential candidacy really, really soon. So exactly what might his education platform be? And how have his policies played out in Wisconsin?


The state's House of Representatives overwhelmingly approved a bill that would inform parents twice a year of their right to exempt children from standardized tests.


Alexander said that he and his staff have been working in close concert with the President Obama and his staff on substance of the reauthorization.


It's hard to discern the shape the Democratic candidate for president's K-12 policies might take from her rhetoric on standards and assessments.


The flexibility under the NCLB law comes with an asterisk: States will still need to set student achievement targets, known as "AMOs," for the 2014-15 school year.


New faces at the Education Department, bus-driver voting patterns, and an AFT ad to get you through to the weekend.


Former Texas Gov. Rick Perry, who once said he'd like to scrap the U.S. Department of Education, is joining the very, very crowded GOP presidential field.


Applicants for both grants can focus on teacher quality, implementing high standards, and high school redesign.


The union's top leadership sat down earlier this week and chatted with three folks vying for the Democratic nomination: Hillary Clinton, the former Secretary of State; Martin O'Malley, the former Maryland governor, and Bernie Sanders, the Vermont senator who considers himself an independent socialist.


The issue of whether the bipartisan Senate ESEA reauthorization bill includes enough protections for poor and minority students is sure to be one of the biggest debates if the bill is brought the Senate floor, as it's expected to sometime this summer.


Now that federal officials have given New Hampshire permission to try local assessments, will it be easy for other states to get the same deal? Maybe not, if Kansas' experience is any guide.


When the Senate's ESEA reauthorization bill is called up for debate at the end of this month or early July, messaging will be crucial to garnering support for the bill from both sides of the aisle.


Graham was a key player among a group of GOP members of Congress that helped delay a proposed national testing plan being pushed by the Clinton administration.


The U.S. Department of Education is taking the unusual step of giving a single, tribal school flexibility from mandates of the No Child Left Behind Act.


Attention state agency officials: Monday is the final deadline to submit plans to the U.S. Department of Education that address the equitable distribution of teachers.


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