July 2015 Archives

Bush touted the achievement of black and Hispanic students in Florida, noting that the number of such students passing AP exams quadrupled during his time as governor.

All the expected characters were at the table: Sens. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., and Patty Murray, D-Wash., and Reps. John Kline, R-Minn., and Bobby Scott, D-Va.

The bill would eliminate the current patchwork of loan assistance programs for teachers, including TEACH grants, and replace them with one streamlined federal program.

U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan may only have eighteen months left in office—but they're critical months when it comes to the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.

Rep. Chaka Fattah, D-Pa., who was previously a member of the House education committee, has pushed for legislation that would require states to equalize educational resources.

A new federal mapping project will help districts plan for more equitable school enrollment.

Takano favors grade-span testing, supports the federal mandate that states and schools test 95 percent of students, and thinks accountability should be entirely left up to states.

The developer and GOP presidential hopeful has hit rival candidate Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker on common core and education cuts. Are his criticisms valid?

The 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act coincides with the 40th anniversary of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, which was signed by President Gerald Ford in November 1975.

Duncan and Company are burning the mid-night oil over...

Seven states ignored the federal higher education law's requirement to identify "at risk" and "low performing" teacher programs, some of them blatantly.

Alaska, Indiana, Maryland, New Jersey, Oregon, Tennessee, and Utah can keep their flexibility from mandates of the No Child Left Behind Act, no matter what happens with a pending rewrite of the law.

NEA culture and governance make it harder for the 3 million-member union to make an early primary endorsement for a presidential candidate.

After 41 years, FERPA is widely viewed as inadequate for addressing privacy challenges presented by the flood of digital devices, software, and apps into U.S. schools over the past decade.

Begin conferencing the House and Senate ESEA bills now, said 10 major education groups in a letter sent Wednesday.

The department's civil rights data collection shows that more than 3 million students are suspended or expelled each year (including 4-year-olds).

Gov. John Kasich doesn't have the kind of high-profile and polarizing history with public schools that former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker can claim. But he has an extensive record.

The House and Senate bills to write the Elementary and Secondary Education Act go in different directions when it comes to testing English-language learners.

Representatives from both parties and both chambers will attempt to find common ground between their dueling reauthorization bills, which contain some stark policy differences.

If the legislation becomes law without major changes before the Obama administration leaves town, there may be an even bigger loser than Duncan: His successor.

GOP lawmakers running for president don't think the bipsartisan Senate bill to renew the Elementary and Secondary Education Act goes far enough in restoring power to parents.

Here's a look at the Senate and House bills to rewrite the NCLB law, and how they compare to each other, current law, and the Obama administration's waivers.

Passage marks a crucial step in getting a bill to the president's desk. The Senate and House can now begin conferencing their dueling reauthorization measures.

The U.S. Senate's bipartisan bill to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act doesn't go nearly far enough when it comes to accountability for low-income students and racial minorities.

Senators also rejected a high-profile amendment from Democrats to beef up accountability measures in the underlying bill to overhaul the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.

The National Education Association sent a letter Tuesday to senators urging them to oppose a Democratic amendment that would beef up accountability in the Senate's ESEA rewrite.

As debate continues on the bill to overhaul the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, senators turned down proposals on three contentious issues.

The U.S. Senate voted down an amendment designed to protect lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender students from discrimination and harassment in public schools. But such protections are already required under Title IX, the National School Boards Association said.

The administration has already played a huge role in shifting the federal role in monitoring states' progress towards turning around low-performing schools and helping struggling students.

The amendment would require states to identify and intervene in their poorest-performing 5 percent of schools and those that graduate less than 67 percent of students for two consecutive years.

Sens. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., and Patty Murray, D-Wash., take note: Hillary Clinton had nice things to say about your bill to revamp the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.

The move could pose problems for senators still finessing amendment language on the ESEA bill, such as Democrats who are working on proposals to beef up accountability.

As far as education is concerned, Walker is perhaps most prominent for his successful push to strip collective bargaining rights for teachers and other public employees in 2011.

Pressure rises, with nearly 150 amendments filed so far on the bill to overhaul the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, though it's unclear how many will make it to the floor.

The American Federation of Teachers kicks off primary season by throwing its muscle behind the former U.S. Senator and Secretary of State.

Under the amendment, more states would gain Title I funding than lose it. But some that would lose funding would lose big time.

Duncan's children will attend the University of Chicago Laboratory Schools, where he himself attended and where his wife will return to work.

Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., slammed the A PLUS amendment, knowing that if adopted it would have sunk his chances of getting the ESEA reauthorization across the finish line.

Delaware, Massachusetts, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, and South Carolina all had their waivers from provisions of the No Child Left Behind Act approved, but some got longer waivers than others.

Democrats cleared their first school choice policy hurdle, defeating a voucher amendment on the second day of debate on an Elementary and Secondary Education Act overhaul bill.

The House vote came as the Senate is debating its own rewrite of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, and the two versions would have to be reconciled.

The forthcoming bullying debate will prompt the first votes on lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender issues since the U.S. Supreme Court ruling on the right to same-sex marriage.

According to the National Federation of High School Associations, young women have 1.3 million fewer chances to play sports in high school, compared to boys.

Less than a year after leaving the U.S. Department of Education, one of Secretary Arne Duncan's former key staffers is returning as a senior adviser.

Below the surface of pleasantries and backslapping, a policy split continues to grow over whether to beef up accountability provisions in the bill to overhaul the education law.

While the administration wishes the bill did more to ensure states focus on their lowest-performing students and schools, it stopped short of issuing a veto threat.

The call came just minutes before the U.S. Senate kicked off debate on its bill and just one day after the White House said that the bill falls short on accountability.

An amendment would provide $30 billion for high-quality, full-day preschool for 4-year-olds from families earning below 200 percent of the federal poverty level.

The Obama administration worries the House and Senate bills to rewrite ESEA don't do go far enough on accountability.

The opt-out movement hasn't really been a key issue as Congress wrestles with reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, but that could change this week.

The good news? The chances of finishing a bill and getting it to the president's desk by the end of this year or early next are better than they ever, ever have been before. The bad news? It's far from a slam dunk.

Webb was a Democratic senator from 2007 to 2013, and worked on English-language learner and testing issues while in the U.S. Senate.

Just five states—Colorado, Minnesota, New York, Rhode Island, and Texas—opted to come up with their own turnaround models and submit them to the U.S. Department of Education for approval.

The House Rules Committee is to meet July 7 to again consider its version of the federal K-12 law's rewrite; a vote could come as early as the next day.

The big question is whether the plans submitted to the Education Department will actually make a difference when it comes to the equitable distribution of teachers.

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