September 2015 Archives

The education secretary says that much could be saved by redirecting some non-violent offenders away from prison, and the money used to boost salaries at high-poverty schools.


Civil rights groups are running radio ads aimed at lawmakers who may play a key role in rewriting the No Child Left Behind Act.


The two national teachers' unions and the group representing state schools chiefs are among those saying now's the time to complete an Elementary and Secondary Education Act rewrite.


Earlier this year, the Lone Star State essentially seemed to be daring U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan to pull its flexibility.


The California Republican, elected in 2006, doesn't have nearly as long a resume on K-12 as did current Speaker John Boehner going into the job.


The U.S. Department of Education is awarding millions under the Charter School Program to fund new charters and expand high-performing networks.


Sources say that the National Education Association, the country's largest union, could endorse the Democratic candidate in a presidential primary battle as early as Friday


A long shutdown could disrupt aid to schools and colleges, the U.S. Department of Education warns.


States that have adopted new tests, or made significant changes to their old ones, will have to undergo peer review by the U.S. Department of Education within the next four to eight months, according to department officials.


The only district-level waiver from many of the mandates of the No Child Left Behind Act will be around for at least one more year.


Rep. John Boehner, R-Ohio, was the chairman of the House Education and the Workforce committee when Congress passed the No Child Left Behind Act in 2001, and played a key role in shepherding NCLB through the legislative process.


The initiative, called the Native Youth Communities Projects Program, encourages grantees to blend strategies to close the achievement gap with culturally relevant programs.


"Public school students should not be penalized because they chose to attend a public charter school," the two congressional representatives wrote to Indiana Superintendent Glenda Ritz.


John King, a senior adviser to Education Secretary Arne Duncan, acknowledged that the recently completed English-learner tool kit is merely the department's "first installment" in support of ELLs.


In what turned out to be his last major campaign push, Walker this month had once again played up his opposition to unions.


Impact Aid and Head Start would be among the first federal education programs to feel the pinch from a government shutdown.


Democratic contenders for the White House have focused on early-childhood education and college access, but not said much about K-12 policy.


South Dakota and the U.S. Department of Education are disagreeing about the state's educator evaluation plans and what they should mean for its NCLB waiver.


Duncan's been dogged by questions about his controversial moves on K-12, including championing new Common Core State Standards tests, expanding charter schools, and evaluations.


U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and I talked accountability, NCLB reauthorization, and the thing he wishes he had done earlier.


Fans of discussions about K-12 policy had little to cheer about Wednesday, but education did get occasional mentions from some of the GOP candidates.


Andrew Marcinek will be the first staff member at the agency ever to serve in the role. He will work out of the office of educational technology under its director, Richard Culatta.


The Common Core State Standards could get the most air time, but other issues have cropped up on the campaign trail since the first debate, such as teachers' unions.


For the past three years, Andrew has brought his signature blend of wonkiness and humor to Education Week's state coverage and to the State Edwatch blog.


With his poll numbers sagging in his presidential campaign, GOP Gov. Scott Walker vowed to end the National Labor Relations Board and reduce union power in other ways.


The president is unveiling changes aiming to give students information about how much aid they qualify for earlier and encourage more low-income students to go after federal grants and loans.


Did any of the nine-governors-turned-presidential candidates really have a stellar standout record when it comes to K-12 policy? The short answer is that there are no obvious superstars.


Education researchers are worried about proposed cuts to the Institute


Lauren Camera is leaving Education Week for the national education reporter's spot at U.S. News and World Report, and Politics K-12 will forge ahead.


Right now, there seems to be no clear enforcement mechanism for making sure that the proposals are actually put into practice.


The president has assembled a panel of leaders who will push for free community college on a state-by-state basis, since Congress hasn't moved forward on a national plan.


The Kentucky senator wants to paint rival GOP presidential hopeful Jeb Bush and the former Florida governor's brother with the same brush on education policy.


Every one of the 42 states that has a waiver applied for renewal, and most have already gotten the green light to hang onto their flexibility for at least one more year. Still waiting in the wings: Colorado, Louisiana, and Texas.


Happy Almost Labor Day! Before you head out for one weekend at the beach, check out these good reads.


Stanford education heavy-hitter Linda Darling-Hammond has launched a new think tank intended to bring evidence into education policy.


The White House launched the program in 2013, and has drawn financial support from ed-tech providers and private organizations with the goal of improving digital education and Web connectivity.


His forthcoming departure puts added pressure on lawmakers in both chambers to come to an agreement on their respective ESEA overhauls before the end of the year.


The administration has quietly allowed more than a dozen waiver states until Obama's last year in office to fully put in place teacher-evaluation systems based on test scores.


The GOP presidential hopeful and former Florida governor also talked about immigration at a town hall meeting Tuesday with high school students in Miami.


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